Private schools treated like ‘society’s villains’ because of ‘stereotyping and prejudice’, says top headteacher

Private schools are the victims of “stereotyping and prejudice” and people should stop treating them as “society’s villains”, a top headteacher will argue on Monday.

Sally-Anne Huang, the first female high master of St Paul’s School in London, will also say that private schools can help “heal” UK society from the “multiple wounds” it has sustained from Covid-19.

Ms Huang has just taken over as chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference, a group of 296 elite private schools.

In a speech to kick off the HMC annual conference she will claim that private schools have been unfairly vilified.

‘Society’s villains’

“As head of an HMC school I expect to be cast as one of society’s villains,” she will say.

“I still get out of bed every day to improve things for young people and, increasingly in recent years, not just the young

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Coronavirus latest: UK cases surge as government says technical fault affects testing data

Jasmine Cameron-Chileshe in London

The number of positive coronavirus cases within the UK surged again on Sunday, with the government admitting that “technical” issues had caused delays in the publication of test results.

A record 22,961 new coronavirus cases were confirmed on Sunday, an increase of more than 10,000 compared with 12,872 on Saturday.

The government said a technical issue had been identified overnight on Friday “in the automated process that transfers positive cases data” to Public Health England.

As a result, the number of coronavirus cases announced on Saturday and Sunday included 15,841 additional cases from between September 25 and Friday. Last night, the government said that the issue, though resolved, would affect case numbers in the next few days.

A message on the coronavirus data dashboard on Saturday warned that data published in the next few days would “include some additional cases” from between September 24 and October

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Under new law, even death can’t stop some Massachusetts voters this election

Of course, how many will have their ballots counted from beyond the veil this November is unclear, as is the number of those who legally voted by mail but died before the state’s Sept. 1 primary, when the new rules also applied.

“There’s a lot of things we haven’t seen before,” Ilene Simons, Salem’s city clerk, said of this year’s unprecedented election season. “I understand the theory behind it: They were alive when they cast their ballot and they really wanted to vote. If I was in that situation and I was able to, I would want to vote in my last election. I get it.”

State lawmakers in July expanded the options amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, passing a bill that allows every registered voter in Massachusetts this fall to cast a ballot by mail, green-lighting early voting for the state primary, and expanding the in-person early voting period

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The Zero-Sum Game of Syrian Politics

On September 28, 1961, Syrian military officers led by Abdul Karim al-Nahlawi altered the course of Syrian and Arab history. With a military coup, they ended the political union between Egypt and Syria known as the United Arab Republic (UAR). Enacted in early 1958, the UAR had been the first step towards the ultimate Arab nationalist dream: the unification of Arab countries into a single state after Ottoman occupation and European colonial division. The 1961 coup ended that dream on a practical level; never again would anyone seriously attempt to unite two major Arab countries. The move also upended the political consensus that had governed Syria since the earliest days after independence in 1946: the desire to create a pan-Arab state. But one other aspect of this coup lives on in Syria to this day, reflected in the political maneuverings that followed the coup.

The coup’s success was short-lived,

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BBC – Travel – Harambee: The law of generosity that rules Kenya

A year ago, I attended a fundraiser for a wedding in an affluent Nairobi neighbourhood called Lavington. As the sweltering midday heat hung in the air, a buzz of laughter and excitement echoed through the crowded tent. Many of the guests were newly graduated environmental activists and young entrepreneurs who openly carried wads of cash, eager to uplift the engaged couple in need. Just as I was getting lost in conversation, the master of ceremony tapped the microphone twice and asked, “Shall we begin this harambee?”

The word means ‘all pull together’ in Kiswahili, Kenya’s national language

A long-standing Kenyan tradition, a harambee is a type of self-help event that’s deeply ingrained in the moral compass of the country. The word means “all pull together” in Kiswahili, Kenya’s national language. It is the nation’s official motto; it appears on the country’s coat of arms; and it encompasses a concept

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Judge: Vanity plate law likely violates First Amendment

AP

October 4, 2020 | 4:01 PM

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A Rhode Island law allowing the Division of Motor Vehicles to reject vanity license plates that are “offensive to good taste” likely violates the First Amendment, a federal judge ruled.

The judge issued a preliminary injunction Friday in support of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the law, which gives the DMV administrator the authority to deny vanity plates based on whether he or she thinks they “might carry connotations offensive to good taste and decency.”

The lawsuit was filed in March against Walter Craddock, state DMV administrator, by the American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island on behalf of Sean Carroll.

Carroll, a Tesla owner, was ordered by the DMV to turn in his plate “FKGAS” or have his registration canceled after the division received a complaint about the plate.

Carroll said the plate was his daughter’s suggestion,

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Global efforts required to realise low carbon society: energy expert

The current energy saving goals and renewable energy policy in EAS (East Asia Summit) countries will contribute to reducing fossil fuel consumption as well as CO2 emissions mitigation, a senior official from the Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA) said.

At the recent GECF Monthly Lecture Series on “EAS Energy Outlook”, special adviser (Energy Affairs) to ERIA President, Shigeru Kimura said unless the US and China take the lead on this transformation, any shift towards the low carbon society will be inadequate.
Special adviser (Energy Affairs) to ERIA President, Shigeru Kimura was speaking at the recent GECF Monthly Lecture Series on ‘EAS Energy Outlook’

“Further, seeing the ASEAN transition from 2017 to 2050 … the region is actually increasing coal, increasing natural gas, and increasing oil, but the renewables only get a little bit rise. That is the ASEAN reality,” Kimura noted during the online lecture.
EAS

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UK government says it will reform ‘broken’ asylum system

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s interior minister vowed Sunday to stop people entering the country clandestinely and to fix what she called a “broken” asylum system, echoing commitments that have been made and broken by U.K. governments for years.



FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019 file photo, Britain's Home Secretary Priti Patel addresses the delegates at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England. Britain’s interior minister vowed Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020 to stop people entering the country clandestinely and to fix what she called a “broken” asylum system, echoing commitments that have been made and broken by U.K. governments for years. Home Secretary Priti Patel said the government would bring in new laws so it could “stop those who come here illegally making endless legal claims to remain” and “expedite the removal of those who have no claim for protection.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, file)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019 file photo, Britain’s Home Secretary Priti Patel addresses the delegates at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England. Britain’s interior minister vowed Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020 to stop people entering the country clandestinely and to fix what she called a “broken” asylum system, echoing commitments that have been made and broken by U.K. governments for years. Home Secretary Priti Patel said the government would bring in new laws so it could “stop those who come here illegally making endless legal claims to remain” and “expedite the removal of those who have no claim for protection.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, file)

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UK Government Says It Will Reform ‘Broken’ Asylum System | World News

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s interior minister vowed Sunday to stop people entering the country clandestinely and to fix what she called a “broken” asylum system, echoing commitments that have been made and broken by U.K. governments for years.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said the government would bring in new laws so it could “stop those who come here illegally making endless legal claims to remain” and “expedite the removal of those who have no claim for protection.”

Patel said in a speech to a virtual Conservative Party conference that the changes would be “the biggest overhaul of our asylum system in decades.”

She said Britain would continue to “provide safe haven to those fleeing persecution, oppression or tyranny.”

Patel’s hardline rhetoric was designed to appeal to voters concerned at a surge in the number of people crossing the English Channel from France in small boats. Thousands have made the journey

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More than 1,000 UK pubs urge the government to rethink 10pm curfews

In September, the UK government announced that all businesses in the sector, including pubs, bars and restaurants can only offer table service and must close at 10pm. Photo: Getty
In September, the UK government announced that all businesses in the sector, including pubs, bars and restaurants can only offer table service and must close at 10pm. Photo: Getty

UK pub owners are “angry” with the government, as more than 1,000 publicans signed an open letter to Rishi Sunak pleading for more government support and to rethink the 10pm curfews.

In the letter organised by grassroots organisation Campaign for Pubs, owners accused Sunak of “scapegoating pubs” and “ignoring the needs of pubs, publicans, staff and their families” in his Winter Economy Plan.

In September, the government’s announced that all businesses in the sector, including pubs, bars and restaurants can offer table service only and must close at 10pm, after UK coronavirus cases spiked.

Campaign for Pubs said owners signed the letter because there is “real anger among licensees about the 10pm curfew, which has no scientific basis, but which makes

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