Supreme Court: Democrats and Republicans seek hints for how Barrett will rule on health care law

For the second day of Barrett’s questioning in the Senate Judiciary Committee, the health care law was a dominant topic on both sides of the aisle thanks to the looming November case the Supreme Court will hear on a Republican effort to strike down the law.

Both Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the panel’s top Democrat, asked President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee about the legal doctrine of “severability,” or whether the entire law can stand if one part of it is deemed unconstitutional, during Barrett’s second day of questions before the committee on Wednesday.

It’s a concept that could play a key factor in the case from Republican attorneys general and the Trump administration that seeks to strike down the Affordable Care Act case next month. They argue the entire law, commonly known as Obamacare, should be struck down because the law’s individual coverage mandate is … Read More

‘It’s not the law of Amy’: SCOTUS nominee Barrett faces Dem skepticism on Day 2 of hearings

WASHINGTON — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett batted away Democrats’ skeptical questions Tuesday on abortion, health care and a possible disputed-election fight over transferring presidential power, insisting in a long and lively confirmation hearing she would bring no personal agenda to the court but decide cases “as they come.”

The 48-year-old appellate court judge declared her conservative views with often colloquial language, but refused many specifics. She declined to say whether she would recuse herself from any election-related cases involving President Donald Trump, who nominated her to fill the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and is pressing to have her confirmed before the the Nov. 3 election.

“Judges can’t just wake up one day and say I have an agenda — I like guns, I hate guns, I like abortion, I hate abortion — and walk in like a royal queen and impose their will on

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Amy Coney Barrett dodges abortion, healthcare and election law questions

On the second day of hearings before the Senate judiciary committee, Democrats pressed supreme court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on healthcare, election law and abortion rights – and met with little success.



a person standing in front of a counter: Photograph: Demetrius Freeman/EPA


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Photograph: Demetrius Freeman/EPA

Related: ‘Slayer Pete’: Buttigieg emerges as Biden’s unlikely Fox News fighter

Donald Trump’s third nominee for the highest court dodged questions on how she might rule on a challenge to the Affordable Care Act (ACA); if she would recuse herself from any lawsuit about the presidential election; and whether she would vote to overturn the landmark 1973 ruling Roe v Wade, which made abortion legal.



a man standing in front of a counter: Supreme court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies during the Senate judiciary committee hearing on Tuesday.


© Photograph: Demetrius Freeman/EPA
Supreme court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies during the Senate judiciary committee hearing on Tuesday.

Barrett argued that she was not a pundit, citing remarks by Justice Elena Kagan and the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg in saying that outside of

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Barrett sidesteps Dianne Feinstein’s abortion questions early in hearings



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Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Tuesday sidestepped questions from California Sen. Dianne Feinstein about whether she thought Roe v. Wade was “wrongly decided.”

Feinstein’s questions, part of a series of questions on abortion, kicked off the Democrats’ grilling of Barrett. After Barrett refused to answer if she thought her mentor, Justice Antonin Scalia, was right to say that Roe was wrongly decided, citing her position as a sitting judge, Feinstein pressed her on the subject.

“On something that is a major cause with major effects on over half the population of this country, who are women, it is distressing not to get a straight answer,” Feinstein said. “Let me try again: Do you agree with Justice Scalia’s view that it was wrongly decided?”

Barrett replied that she had “no agenda” but would not answer the question because of her legal position. Feinstein continued to

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Amy Coney Barrett Hearing: Why She Accepted on the Nomination

During his questioning at this morning’s round of Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearing, Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham asked the judge how it feels to be nominated for the Supreme Court.

Barrett’s reply was thoughtful and very humanizing. Here’s what she said:

I’ve tried to be on a media blackout for the sake of my mental health but you can’t keep yourself walled off from everything. I’m aware of a lot of caricatures that are floating around. I think what I would like to say in response to that question is, look, I’ve made distinct choices. I’ve decided to pursue a career and have a large family. I have a multiracial family. Our faith is important to us. All of those things are true, but they are my choices. In my personal interactions with people, I mean, I have a life brimming with people who’ve made different choices,

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Yes, the Barrett Hearings Are About the Election, Not the Law

(Bloomberg Opinion) — The Amy Coney Barrett nomination hearings have started and guess what? They’re just as much of an election-year circus as everyone expected them to be.

Back in 2016, when Republicans claimed that nominating and confirming a Supreme Court justice during an election year was a violation of the electorate’s right to choose, they were fond of citing something they called the “Biden rule.” In fact, what Joe Biden said when he was Judiciary Committee chair in the summer of 1992 was that if a vacancy were to arise after his June 25 speech, he would urge President George H.W. Bush to wait to nominate a new justice until after the election, and at any rate he would not hold hearings until afterward.

Why? Because “where the nation should be treated to a consideration of constitutional philosophy, all it will get in such circumstances is a partisan bickering

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Keith Olbermann: Amy Coney Barrett, Trump supporters must be ‘removed from our society’

Keith Olbermann is having no trouble finding his voice after leaving ESPN for the third time last week, declaring during his new political commentary show on YouTube that President Trump’s supporters and his “enablers” like Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett should be prosecuted and “removed from society.”

Mr. Olbermann announced last week that he was exiting his contract with ESPN early in order to “serve my country” with daily anti-Trump commentary on YouTube ahead of the Nov. 3 election. During the second episode of his show, “The Worst Person in the World,” he hypothesized that Mr. Trump would reject the results of the upcoming election and would not willingly leave the White House if he loses. And even if this “demonic president” did by chance concede defeat, he would immediately announce afterward that he is seeking reelection in 2024, Mr. Olbermann claimed.

Thus, Mr. Olbermann argued, Mr. Trump “must

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Law scholar Jonathan Turley takes on Chris Wallace regarding Amy Coney Barrett and the Affordable Care Act

Law scholar Jonathan Turley took on Fox News’s Chris Wallace regarding Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearings for the Supreme Court and the Affordable Care Act.





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“You need, truly, waders to get through the rising hypocrisy from both parties. That’s nothing new. Both parties are adopting the opposite views that they had in 2016. Although I’m not too sure the Democrats would be doing anything different if they were given this vacancy and this opportunity. But I want … Chris Wallace raises some good points. The lower court did strike down the ACA, but there … does not appear to be a majority of votes from our count of overturning the entire Act. In fact, the betting money is that conservatives might join liberals,” Turley said on Monday on Fox News.

Wallace interjected, “Jonathan, if I may, you know, the point I’m simply making

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Republicans defend Barrett confirmation hearing; Democrats warn she would overturn healthcare law

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett arrives for her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett arrives for her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) warned of a “long, contentious week” of confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, but pledged to try to deliver a fair process as Republicans aim to sprint President Trump’s nominee to the court by election day.

“This is probably not about persuading each other unless something really dramatic happens,” Graham said, addressing the senators in the hearing room and those watching remotely. “All the Republicans will vote yes and all the Democrats will vote no,” he predicted.

Graham defended Republicans’ decision to move the nomination so close to the November election following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Graham previously promised twice that he would not fill a Supreme Court vacancy if it occurred in

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Amy Coney Barrett: Senate opens hearing into Trump Supreme Court pick

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Media captionWatch live coverage as Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearing begins

Amy Coney Barrett, US President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, is going before the Senate Judiciary Committee for what could be a fiery confirmation hearing over the next four days.

The 48-year-old conservative jurist has vowed to judge legal cases impartially.

Judge Barrett’s nomination so close to the 3 November presidential election has sparked a political row between the Republicans and rival Democrats.

Judge Barrett’s approval would cement a conservative majority on the top court.

Conservative-leaning justices would then hold a 6-3 majority, shifting its ideological balance for potentially decades to come.

President Trump picked Judge Barrett to replace liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last month aged 87.

The Republicans – who currently hold a slim majority in the US Senate, the body that appoints Supreme Court judges –

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