Harry Reid Claims U.S. Government Covered Up UFO Evidence for Years

Former Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) says the U.S. government has worked for years to cover up evidence of possible close encounters with UFOs. 

Reid, who pushed for the creation of a classified, now-defunct U.S. government UFO program, said in The Phenomenon, a new documentary by director James Fox, that “there’s more than one up there.”

Most of the evidence the government has around UFOs “hasn’t seen the light of day,” he said.

“We have it — it’s there,” the 80-year-old said. 

He said the government “did everything they could” to stop the UFO program and “wanted nothing to do with this.”

“Nobody has to agree why it’s there. But shouldn’t we at least be spending some money to study all these phenomenon? Shouldn’t we study this stuff? The answer is yes. That’s all this was about,” he said.

“And why the federal government all these years

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Liz Truss claims guaranteeing all UK farming standards in law will disrupt trade

Liz Truss has rebuffed fresh calls to guarantee in law all UK farming standards, claiming such a move would disrupt trade with developing nations.



Elizabeth Truss walking down the street talking on a cell phone: International Trade Secretary Liz Truss (Leon Neal/PA)


© Leon Neal
International Trade Secretary Liz Truss (Leon Neal/PA)

The International Trade Secretary told MPs Labour’s approach could result in a “blanket ban” on any food products which do not comply exactly with British farming regulations.

Speaking in the Commons, Ms Truss asked Labour counterpart Emily Thornberry: “So is she saying she wants to ban Kenyans from exporting their products to us if they don’t follow exactly the same farm standards as here in Britain?

“I want to make sure our farmers are able to continue with their high standards, but I don’t want to stop developing countries exporting their goods to us.”

The pair clashed during

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Kyrgyzstan opposition claims power after storming government buildings

Opposition groups in Kyrgyzstan said they had seized power in the strategically-important Central Asian country on Tuesday after taking control of government buildings in the capital during protests over a parliamentary election.



a group of people standing around a fire: People protesting the results of an election gather Tuesday by a bonfire in front of the main government building, known as the White House, in Bishkek.


© VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images
People protesting the results of an election gather Tuesday by a bonfire in front of the main government building, known as the White House, in Bishkek.

President Sooronbai Jeenbekov said the country, which hosts a Russian air base and a large Canadian-controlled gold mine, was facing an attempted coup d’etat. He ordered security forces not to open fire on protesters however.

One person was killed and 590 wounded in unrest overnight, the government said. The opposition said it had freed Almazbek Atambayev, a former president jailed on corruption charges, and was already discussing the lineup of a provisional government.

It was not clear what role, if any, Atambayev would receive, and Jeenbekov, the

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New US Jobless Claims Fall To 837,000: Government

New jobless claim filings in the United States fell to 837,000 last week seasonally adjusted, the Labor Department said Thursday, resuming their downward trajectory after increasing slightly earlier in the month.

Initial claims fell by 36,000 over the previous week’s level, however the number of people filing under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program for workers who aren’t normally eligible rose by more than 34,000 to 650,120.

The data is also complicated by most-populous state California’s decision to pause processing claims for the two weeks to October 3 to address a backlog, meaning the level it reported Thursday was the same as the previous week and will be revised later.

The drop in initial claims was better than forecast but remains well above the single worst week reported during the 2008-2010 global financial crisis more than six months after business shutdowns to stop the spread of Covid-19 began in the US.

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Japanese court opens government and TEPCO to further Fukushima claims

TOKYO (Reuters) – A Japanese appeal court on Wednesday ruled that the state and Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings (TEPCO) could have taken steps to prevent the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster and are therefore liable for compensation claims.

The ruling by the Sendai High Court, which upholds a lower court decision, means the government and TEPCO must pay 1.01 billion yen ($9.6 million) to 3,550 plaintiffs forced to flee their homes after a magnitude 9 earthquake triggered a tsunami that devastated the country’s northeast and crippled the Fukushima nuclear plant, public broadcaster NHK reported.

The ruling could open up the government to further damage claims because thousands of other residents evacuated as reactors at the coastal power station overheated and released a radioactive cloud. While some people have returned home, areas close to the plant are still off limits.

The court said that the government could have taken measures to

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Japanese Court Opens Government and TEPCO to Further Fukushima Claims | World News

TOKYO (Reuters) – A Japanese appeal court on Wednesday ruled that the state and Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings (TEPCO) could have taken steps to prevent the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster and are therefore liable for compensation claims.

The ruling by the Sendai High Court, which upholds a lower court decision, means the government and TEPCO must pay 1.01 billion yen ($9.6 million) to 3,550 plaintiffs forced to flee their homes after a magnitude 9 earthquake triggered a tsunami that devastated the country’s northeast and crippled the Fukushima nuclear plant, public broadcaster NHK reported.

The ruling could open up the government to further damage claims because thousands of other residents evacuated as reactors at the coastal power station overheated and released a radioactive cloud. While some people have returned home, areas close to the plant are still off limits.

The court said that the government could have taken measures to

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Despite Claims, Trump Rarely Uses Wartime Law in Battle Against Covid

As schools reopen and cold weather heightens the likelihood of a spike in coronavirus cases, nurses and doctors fear that shortages of the respirator masks, surgical gowns and disposable gloves needed to shield them from infection will return with a vengeance.

President Trump has sweeping powers to compel companies to produce protective gear and to guarantee that the federal government will pay them for it — and as his election campaign intensifies, he has been boasting about aggressively using them. But in fact, most of his administration’s use of that authority, granted under the Cold-War Defense Production Act, has had nothing to do with the pandemic.

A White House report released last month claimed that Mr. Trump has wielded the act nearly 80 times to alleviate shortages of masks and other medical supplies.

“My administration has harnessed the full power of the Defense Production Act to achieve the greatest industrial

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