Supreme Court: Democrats and Republicans seek hints for how Barrett will rule on health care law

For the second day of Barrett’s questioning in the Senate Judiciary Committee, the health care law was a dominant topic on both sides of the aisle thanks to the looming November case the Supreme Court will hear on a Republican effort to strike down the law.

Both Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the panel’s top Democrat, asked President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee about the legal doctrine of “severability,” or whether the entire law can stand if one part of it is deemed unconstitutional, during Barrett’s second day of questions before the committee on Wednesday.

It’s a concept that could play a key factor in the case from Republican attorneys general and the Trump administration that seeks to strike down the Affordable Care Act case next month. They argue the entire law, commonly known as Obamacare, should be struck down because the law’s individual coverage mandate is … Read More

Republicans defend Barrett confirmation hearing; Democrats warn she would overturn healthcare law

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett arrives for her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett arrives for her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) warned of a “long, contentious week” of confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, but pledged to try to deliver a fair process as Republicans aim to sprint President Trump’s nominee to the court by election day.

“This is probably not about persuading each other unless something really dramatic happens,” Graham said, addressing the senators in the hearing room and those watching remotely. “All the Republicans will vote yes and all the Democrats will vote no,” he predicted.

Graham defended Republicans’ decision to move the nomination so close to the November election following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Graham previously promised twice that he would not fill a Supreme Court vacancy if it occurred in

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Democrat’s praise of strict gun law roils Kansas Senate race | National politics

“They have no guns. They don’t allow them. They just took them all away,” Bollier told her audience. “And you know what? It’s pretty darn safe.”

Bollier also noted that Australia imposes licensing and training requirements for gun owners. Kansas law allows adults to carry weapons openly, and it allows them to carry concealed firearms without a permit — a policy Bollier opposed as a legislator when it was enacted in 2015.

“Who thinks you can just go out and have a gun? Seriously,” Bollier said. “You can’t drive a car without training. You can’t basically do anything without some kind of training. This is a lethal weapon.”

As the video clip began circulating, Bollier tweeted Sunday afternoon: “I do not support gun confiscation. I never have. I never will.”

Republicans have not lost a Senate race in Kansas since 1932, but Bollier has flooded the airwaves with ads that

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Democrat’s Praise of Strict Gun Law Roils Kansas Senate Race | Political News

By JOHN HANNA, AP Political Writer

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Republicans on Sunday circulated a video of the Democrats’ candidate for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas praising strict Australian gun laws that she said “took them all away” to undercut her campaign as a political moderate in what’s been an unexpectedly tough red-state race for the GOP.

Democrat Barbara Bollier’s spokeswoman accused Republican Roger Marshall’s campaign of being “duplicitous” in highlighting the video. Bollier’s campaign released longer audio from the same event that included moments in which Bollier said she supports the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protecting gun rights and recalled hunting with her father.

The race appears to be close between Marshall, a two-term congressman for western and central Kansas, and Bollier, a Kansas City-area state senator who was a lifelong moderate Republican before switching parties late in 2018. As the GOP fights to keep

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Democrat’s praise of strict gun law roils Kansas Senate race

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Republicans on Sunday circulated a video of the Democrats’ candidate for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas praising strict Australian gun laws that she said “took them all away” to undercut her campaign as a political moderate in what’s been an unexpectedly tough red-state race for the GOP.



U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., the Republican nominee for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas, speaks during a stop in a GOP bus tour of the state, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, in Topeka, Kan. Asked about President Donald Trump's tweet after being treated for coronavirus that people should not fear COVID-19, Marshall told reporters, "Of course, I think everyone should respect the virus." (AP Photo/John Hanna)


© Provided by Associated Press
U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., the Republican nominee for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas, speaks during a stop in a GOP bus tour of the state, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, in Topeka, Kan. Asked about President Donald Trump’s tweet after being treated for coronavirus that people should not fear COVID-19, Marshall told reporters, “Of course, I think everyone should respect the virus.” (AP Photo/John Hanna)

Democrat Barbara Bollier’s spokeswoman accused Republican Roger Marshall’s campaign of being “duplicitous” in highlighting the video. Bollier’s campaign released longer audio from the same event

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Ben Sasse: Democrats nixing filibuster ‘suicide bombing’ of government

  • Sen. Ben Sasse slammed Joe Biden and Senate Democrats for declining to state their position on expanding the Supreme Court and called out the party for considering an elimination of the filibuster, according to The Hill.
  • “What they’re really talking about — or refusing to talk about — is the suicide bombing of two branches of government,” Sasse said.
  • Joe Biden has stated that he’ll express his position on adding seats to the Supreme Court after the election.
  • Amid questions about how Judge Amy Coney Barrett would rule in major cases, Sasse defended her, saying that she was “very clear about her jurisprudence” as “an originalist and a textualist.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sen. Ben Sasse on Sunday harshly criticized Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for declining to state his position on expanding the Supreme Court and called out Senate Democrats for considering an elimination of the

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Sasse accuses Democrats of ‘suicide bombing of two branches of government’

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSunday shows preview: Trump, top Republicans recover from COVID-19; stimulus bill remains in limbo GOP vows quick confirmation of Trump’s Supreme Court pick amid coronavirus turmoil McConnell: Plan is to confirm Trump’s Supreme Court pick before election MORE (R-Neb.) said on Sunday that Democrats expanding the Supreme Court and ending the filibuster would be “suicide bombing” and called Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district Nebraska district could prove pivotal for Biden in November Bringing Black men back home MORE’s refusal to clarify whether he would expand the court “grotesque.”

“It’s grotesque that Vice President Biden won’t answer that very basic question,” Sasse, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said on “Fox News Sunday.”

The Nebraska Republican said an expansion of the court, combined with the elimination of the filibuster, would constitute a

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Tech giants have skirted regulation because of how monopolies are defined by law. Democrats now want to rewrite those laws.



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Jeff Bezos standing in front of a television: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images


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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images

  • Now that House Democrats have completed a sweeping antitrust investigation into Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google, they’re prepared to introduce new laws to curb the tech giants’ power.
  • The 449-page report published by the House Antitrust Subcommittee on Tuesday, as well as public statements by Democrats on the heels of the report, signal how they might go about changing the laws.
  • Antitrust court decisions in recent decades have focused on consumer welfare, but Democrats say laws need to be updated given that many tech companies don’t charge consumers for their products and have wide-ranging impacts on workers and other businesses.
  • Meanwhile, Republicans
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House Democrats pushed through an aid package with little chance of becoming law.

House Democrats on Thursday pushed through a $2.2 trillion stimulus plan that would provide aid to families, schools, restaurants, businesses and airline workers, advancing a wish list with little chance of becoming law.

The pandemic relief measure passed the House on a 214-to-207 vote, with at least 17 Democrats joining Republicans in opposing it. The handful of moderate Democrats who bucked their party argued that with negotiations still taking place with the Trump administration, the chamber should vote on a bipartisan deal.

Republicans had already panned the relief bill as too large.

The decision to put it to a vote anyway on Thursday evening reflected mounting anxiety among some rank-and-file Democrats at the prospect of facing voters next month without being able to point to some action to provide relief. There was also a desire among some party members to formalize their latest offer.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi insisted that there

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House Democrats discuss tougher antitrust law, some Republicans agree

By Diane Bartz

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel discussed ways to tighten antitrust laws on Thursday, with two Republicans on the Democrat-dominated panel indicating potential support for some changes.

The antitrust subcommittee, chaired by Representative David Cicilline, is expected to release a much-anticipated report into the four big tech companies — Amazon.com Inc <AMZN.O>, Facebook Inc <FB.O>, Apple <APPL.O> and Alphabet’s Google <GOOGL.O> — as soon as Monday.

In the hearing, Cicilline said the tech companies used strategies such as self-preferencing and predatory pricing to grow. “These once-scrappy, underdog startups have grown into the kinds of monopolies we last saw more than a century ago,” he said.

One witness, Bill Baer, who headed the Justice Department Antitrust Division during the Obama administration, argued to the committee that successive court rulings over the years have made it harder to block a merger.

“If courts

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