Kyrgyz parliament set to meet, discuss new government amid unrest

BISHKEK (Reuters) – Kyrgyzstan’s parliament was set to meet on Saturday and potentially vote in a new government to end a power vacuum in the strategically important Central Asian nation which has been gripped by unrest since a contested Oct. 4 election.

The former Soviet republic of 6.5 million hosts a Russian military airbase and serves as a hub for trade with neighbouring China. It is also home to a large Canadian-owned mining operation.

Military checkpoints were put up overnight around capital Bishkek and armoured personnel carriers were spotted in the city after President Sooronbai Jeenbekov ordered troops to deploy and re-establish order amid flare-ups of violence.

The parliament planned to gather in the presidential residence on the outskirts of Bishkek, after its own offices were ransacked by protesters who seized key government buildings on Tuesday.

Russia, which exerts significant influence on Kyrgyzstan, this week described the situation as “chaos”.

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In call with Democratic senator, Barrett declines to discuss how she might rule on health-care law

Particularly scrutinized is a 2017 essay that Barrett penned for a Notre Dame Law School journal in which she argued that Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., Jr., who wrote the majority opinion when the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the health-care law in 2012, “pushed the Affordable Care Act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute.”

Sen. Christopher A. Coons (D-Del.), who talked by phone with Barrett on Wednesday, said he asked her about a pair of Supreme Court decisions upholding the Affordable Care Act as well as the 2017 essay. Barrett, Coons said, repeatedly declined to speak to the specifics of a case, saying “she wouldn’t get into the details of how she might rule.”

“The ACA is not just on the docket of the Supreme Court,” Coons, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told reporters on Wednesday. “It’s on the ballot this fall.”

The

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House Democrats discuss tougher antitrust law, some Republicans agree

By Diane Bartz

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel discussed ways to tighten antitrust laws on Thursday, with two Republicans on the Democrat-dominated panel indicating potential support for some changes.

The antitrust subcommittee, chaired by Representative David Cicilline, is expected to release a much-anticipated report into the four big tech companies — Amazon.com Inc <AMZN.O>, Facebook Inc <FB.O>, Apple <APPL.O> and Alphabet’s Google <GOOGL.O> — as soon as Monday.

In the hearing, Cicilline said the tech companies used strategies such as self-preferencing and predatory pricing to grow. “These once-scrappy, underdog startups have grown into the kinds of monopolies we last saw more than a century ago,” he said.

One witness, Bill Baer, who headed the Justice Department Antitrust Division during the Obama administration, argued to the committee that successive court rulings over the years have made it harder to block a merger.

“If courts

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Alabama’s governor apologizes to Sarah Collins Rudolph, a survivor of the 1963 Birmingham church bombing, and says government ready to discuss reparations

After lawyers requested an apology and financial reparations for a survivor of the 1963 Birmingham church bombing, Alabama’s governor has somewhat obliged: offering a formal apology, while proposing further discussions as the woman seeks restitution.



a man and a woman sitting on a couch: Sarah Collins Rudolph sits with her husband, George Rudolph. Earlier this month, Collins Rudolph's legal team requested a formal apology and restitution for the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.


© Jay Reeves/AP
Sarah Collins Rudolph sits with her husband, George Rudolph. Earlier this month, Collins Rudolph’s legal team requested a formal apology and restitution for the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Sarah Collins Rudolph’s lawyers pressed Gov. Kay Ivey earlier this month to offer her a formal apology and restitution for the losses Collins Rudolph suffered as a result of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, including the loss of her sister and her vision in one eye.

Wednesday, Ivey responded, calling the bombing on September 15, 1963, “one of the darkest days in Alabama’s history.”

“Thankfully, the violence that unfolded on that fateful Sunday morning — and other incidents during this difficult chapter

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Exelixis to Host Investor Briefing to Discuss Data Presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology Virtual Congress 2020

ALAMEDA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Exelixis, Inc. (Nasdaq: EXEL) today announced it will host an investor briefing to discuss data presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Virtual Congress 2020. The online-only event will be held following the closing of the Congress’ sessions on Saturday, September 19, 2020, beginning at 22:00 (10:00 p.m.) CEST / 4:00 p.m. EDT / 1:00 p.m. PDT.

During the briefing, Exelixis management and invited guests from the clinical community will discuss and provide context for the cabozantinib clinical data presented at the Congress. Exelixis previously announced that detailed results from CheckMate -9ER, the phase 3 pivotal trial evaluating CABOMETYX® (cabozantinib) in combination with Opdivo® (nivolumab) compared with sunitinib in previously untreated patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, will be presented during the Congress’ Presidential Symposium I earlier in the day. The investor briefing will also review data from COSMIC-021, the

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Education, Politics, and the Future of Our Republic – It’s Serious, Let’s Discuss Our Schools

It’s difficult to change very much in education, especially on any sort of short time table. Not long ago, I was discussing this topic with an acquaintance of mine and he made a rather interesting observation along this line, and he stated that there is quite a bit of “cultural resistance” as well as a strong “desire to preserve the status quo, which has resulted in more failed schools than ever” and with that said, it reminded me of some of the challenges we have in this great nation with real substantive change, that is to say changes needed in our educational system.

It’s amazing, in CA our teachers union rules the streets, both main and Wall Street it seems sometimes CALPERS. This is indeed unfortunate that teachers unions have been largely responsible for the stagnation that we’ve seen in education. At least in the competitive marketplace, companies need to … Read More