Law School Grad Goes Into Labor During Bar Exam, Finishes Test

A recent law school grad who was taking the bar exam in order to become a lawyer was complicated by the fact that her water broke mid-exam. She completed the test afterward. 

Brianna Hill, who just completed law school at Chicago’s Loyola University, took her bar exam last Monday, which lined up with her 38th week of pregnancy. Like a lot of things this year the timing had been junked up by the pandemic, which ended up pushing her exam date back to Oct. 5. As one might expect, that switch of dates proved pretty stressful.

“I thought I would only be 28 weeks pregnant when I took the bar,” Hill said to CNN. “However, due to the pandemic, the test was pushed to October and I was going to be 38 weeks. I joked about taking the test from my hospital bed. Lesson learned!”

Reports state that Hill had

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October bar exam saw some technical glitches from ExamSoft

  • An estimated 40,000 rising lawyers started a multiday bar exam today, which is being administered remotely for most of them after months of delay because of the pandemic.
  • Some examinees complained of glitches, lags, and other technical issues on the test, which is being run by ExamSoft, a Texas test-taking software company.
  • Others complained about long hold times for technical troubleshooting or said they were told to give up and take the exam in February.
  • The testing company claimed that 97% of users were able to start the first session by early Monday afternoon, and 98% of users were able to get logged in to their sessions by 2:45 p.m. Eastern.
  • If you’d like to share your experience with the bar exam and diploma privilege, please reach out to us at [email protected] and [email protected]
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After months of uncertainty and upheaval amid the coronavirus,

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Court rejects students’ bid to practice law without passing exam



As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.


© AP /

As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.


As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.

A petition by two recent graduates, signed by nearly 1,900 students, said an online exam using little-tested software would be unreliable and unfair to low-income and minority students who lacked equal access to computers and quiet space at home. The justices denied a hearing on their request without comment.

But the court will soon consider another option, a plan by the State Bar to let law school graduates practice law in California under

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Law School Essay Exam Answers: Write for Your Audience!

If you were to write a book for youngsters about how to play baseball, or an adult-oriented romance novel, your “audience” would be easy to identify. In the first example, you’d be writing for an age group between 7 and 11; the readers would all be interested in baseball; and they’d be, let’s say, beginner-to-intermediate level of capability and sophistication in the sport. In the second example, you could Google the demographics for who buys romance novels, and get a pretty good idea of who might purchase your book. Audience identification is critical whenever you write-and that’s the case when you write answers to law school essay exam questions as well.

When you write the answer to a law school essay exam question, your audience is fictional. Think of your audience (reader) as an informed attorney or a colleague (law student) who is quite familiar with the nature and purpose … Read More

Avoid Conclusory Statements in Law School Essay Exam Answers

Law school essay examination answers that do not supply the explanatory information detailing step-by-step how each issue can be resolved are said to be “conclusory.” That is, they recite conclusions without stating supportive analysis. Here’s an example of a conclusory statement taken from an exam answer: “Because Adam’s intent manifested the malice required for murder, he will be convicted.” The problem here is that although the statement may be true, the writer has not told the reader (professor) precisely which of Adam’s acts show he had the malice required to prove murder, what degree or variety of intent the law considers sufficient to prove malice, nor what type or variety of malice is required to obtain a murder conviction.

Here’s a better way to handle the Adam/intent issue.

The intent required to obtain a conviction for murder is malice. Malice can be proven by demonstrating that the defendant had the … Read More