Lipocine Announces Presentations at the 21st Annual Fall Meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America

SALT LAKE CITY, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Lipocine Inc. (NASDAQ: LPCN), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on metabolic and endocrine disorders, today announced it will present results from studies suggesting that low testosterone levels may play an important role on the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in men as well as the safety and efficacy of TLANDO™, an oral testosterone replacement therapy without a dose titration requirement, at the 21st Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (“SMSNA”). Lipocine will outline the possible mechanisms and clinical evidence that suggests men with low testosterone have poor COVID-19 outcomes, and the rationale of using an oral testosterone therapy for men with COVID-19. Results from the previously completed dose validation (“DV”) study of a fixed dose TLANDO in hypogonadal males will also be presented at the meeting.  The presentations will take place virtually on November 9, 2020

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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Health care law on line at court, but is it likely to fall?

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump’s nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage.

But that’s not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10, just one week after the election.

Yes, the Trump administration is asking the high court to throw out the Obama-era healthcare law, and if she is confirmed quickly Barrett could be on the Supreme Court when the court hears the case.

But even if the justices agree that the law’s mandate to buy health insurance is unconstitutional because Congress repealed the penalties for not complying, they could still leave the rest of the law alone. That would be consistent with other rulings in which the court excised a problematic provision from a law that was otherwise allowed to remain

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Manitowoc Historical Society plans fall stroll for mid-October, plus more local news

Waldo Boulevard opens to traffic after ceremony

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Manitowoc County Historical Society to host Fall Stroll in mid-October



a tree in front of a house: Manitowoc County's Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.


© Courtesy of Manitowoc County Historical Society
Manitowoc County’s Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.

Manitowoc County Historical Society, 924 Pinecrest Road in Manitowoc, is offering a fall site stroll for guests to enjoy the natural beauty of the historic Pinecrest Village from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 16-17.

The village is open for strolling amid the coronavirus pandemic, but all historic buildings are closed to the public. The McAllister House Welcome Center will be open for restrooms and the Museum Store. When people are indoors, masks are required. Restrooms are also available on the back of the General Store/Meat Market.

Pick-up will also be held during these times for those who have reserved an All Hallow’s Eve STEAM Pack. Packs will be available for pick-up

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Preservation Society of Charleston’s Fall Tours about to begin, with COVID-related changes | Features

For more than four decades, the Preservation Society of Charleston’s Fall Tours have been a regular feature of autumn, offering a chance to tour grand historic homes and gardens, but the novel coronavirus pandemic has required some significant changes.

Notably, this year tours that run from Oct. 8 through Nov. 7 will not be taking guests inside homes. The Preservation Society is instead offering “Piazzas, Porches & Gardens Tours” along with a large selection of themed guided walking tours. 



How SC women fought for and earned the right the vote

“We really put a lot of thought into how to handle an educational program during COVID,” said Kristopher King, executive director of the 100-year-old preservation group. “What we’ve really focused on is staying outside.”

“We’re actually able to layer in a lot more history about Charleston architecture and gardens,” he said. “We can really talk about the stuff that really gets us excited — the history, architecture and gardens.”

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Personal Income And Savings Fall As Government Supports Fade

By Robert Hughes

Personal income fell 2.7 percent in August, according to data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Personal income data over the past six months have been sharply distorted by lockdown policies which caused massive layoffs, and government stimulus programs that sent transfer payments skyrocketing. As those payments fade, measures of personal income and components are returning to trend.

Disposable personal income fell 3.2 percent after a 0.3 percent increase in July. The personal savings rate fell in August, coming in at 14.1 percent of disposable income following rates down from 17.7 percent in July and a peak of 33.6 percent in April (see first chart).

The drop in personal income consisted, in part, of a 1.3 percent increase in wages and salaries. Wages and salaries, which typically account for about half of personal income, rose as some employees went back to work after lockdown policies were eased.

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New US Jobless Claims Fall To 837,000: Government

New jobless claim filings in the United States fell to 837,000 last week seasonally adjusted, the Labor Department said Thursday, resuming their downward trajectory after increasing slightly earlier in the month.

Initial claims fell by 36,000 over the previous week’s level, however the number of people filing under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program for workers who aren’t normally eligible rose by more than 34,000 to 650,120.

The data is also complicated by most-populous state California’s decision to pause processing claims for the two weeks to October 3 to address a backlog, meaning the level it reported Thursday was the same as the previous week and will be revised later.

The drop in initial claims was better than forecast but remains well above the single worst week reported during the 2008-2010 global financial crisis more than six months after business shutdowns to stop the spread of Covid-19 began in the US.

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Oxford is asking students specializing in China to submit papers anonymously so they don’t fall foul of Hong Kong’s draconian national security law



a person standing in front of a church: The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images


© Oil Scarff/Getty Images
The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images

  • The University of Oxford has told students of Chinese politics to submit work anonymously to avoid falling foul of China’s national security law, The Guardian reported Monday.
  • The law, imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, gave China the power to define and punish “separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference.”
  • But China says it applies to everyone, even those not in China or Hong Kong.
  • An associate professor of Chinese politics at Oxford, told The Guardian that students would be “submitting and presenting work anonymously in order to afford some extra protection.”
  • Princeton and Harvard Business School have also taken steps to safeguard students studying Chinese politics.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

The University of Oxford has asked students of Chinese politics to submit their work for grading anonymously so that they don’t

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