A poorly worded state law could decide the fate of R.I. political operative

The judge said he won’t issue a ruling in the high-profile trial for another five to seven weeks – meaning the verdict will come in after Election Day, when Mattiello faces another hard-fought re-election campaign in House District 15.

The weeklong trial concluded on Friday after prosecutors made final oral arguments, claiming that Britt committed a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison when he funneled $1,000 to a defeated Republican candidate, Shawna Lawton, so she could put out a mailer endorsing Mattiello, a Cranston Democrat.

Mattiello testified on Thursday, saying he never authorized the Lawton mailer and was angry when it hit the mailboxes in his district just before Election Day.

After hearing final arguments, Procaccini said Rhode Island’s money laundering statute has “gone virtually unnoticed” for many years.

“I consulted with my colleagues. I’ve been on the bench for 20 years,” he said. “No one recalls

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Democrats focus Supreme Court battle on fate of health-care law under Trump

“Obamacare is terrible. It doesn’t work. We’ve made the best of it,” Trump said at a White House news conference, one day after he had introduced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Democrats say Trump is rushing the nomination in hopes of improving his reelection chances and in preparation for a potential court fight over the results. But with little chance to block Barrett’s confirmation, Democrats are increasingly turning to the practical question of her vote in a case the high court will hear a week after Election Day.

“If we can end Obamacare and come up with a much better health-care system that’s much cheaper and much better, which is what we’ll do,” the country would be better off, Trump said.

Democrats think Barrett could spell the end of the law’s popular guarantee that health care cannot be denied to

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Mississippi to decide fate of Jim Crow-era law designed to secure ‘white supremacy’



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This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking month-long series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.



a man standing in front of a box: Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.


© Sarah Warnock/Clarion Ledger via USA Today Network, FILE
Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.

Mississippi voters have never elected a Black candidate to statewide office, despite having the largest proportional Black population of any U.S. state at nearly 40%.

Advocates hope an amendment on the November ballot may change that.

Mississippi is the only state with a multistep process for electing statewide positions like governor, attorney general and secretary of state. Its electoral college-like voting system was designed by white framers in Southern Reconstruction with the intent to disenfranchise minority voters and uphold white power in politics.



a person standing in front of a box: Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.


© Sarah Warnock/Clarion

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