Federal government says it will not pay fines for Portland courthouse fence

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will not pay the multi-million dollar fines it owes to two Portland bureaus for erecting an iron fence around the federal courthouse in the city.



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In letters to the Portland Bureau of Transportation and the Bureau of Environmental Services obtained by Pamplin Media, Federal Protective Service Assistant Director David A. Hess claimed the U.S. Constitution’s Supremacy Clause absolves the agency from city fines.

“The Federal Government is absolutely immune from fines or penalties issued by local governments unless there is a clear waiver of sovereign immunity by Congress,” Hess wrote. “There has been no such waiver here.”

The PBOT originally fined the federal government for blocking city bike lanes with the security fence it set up around the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse during this summer’s protests.

At a rate of $500 every 15 minutes, or $48,000

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Federal Government Support Lift Asset Markets In September

The purpose of this article is to examine the USA sectoral flows for September 2020 and assess the likely impact on markets as we advance.

Source: FRED, CBO and author’s calculations based thereon

The table above shows the financial balance of financial flows from the USA national accounts since April this year when the Federal Government response to the COVID crisis started.

The flow to the private domestic sector (where the asset markets are) was over fifty percent lower than last month but still positive at over $79B.

Asset markets can be expected to keep climbing as the injection of more money is factored into their prices.

The chart below from the CBO shows the deficit spending path.

The chart above shows the big difference in deficit spending year over year. The CBO summarising the result for September as follows:

The table below shows that the overall Federal expenditures were

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Federal government allowing permits for seismic blasting in Atlantic Ocean to expire

All manner of marine life, from plankton to the largest of whales, will be spared from months of nonstop thunderous seismic blasts that could kill or harm them because the oil and gas explorers and the federal government are allowing their permits to expire on Nov. 30 — and it would take at least a year for them to obtain new ones — should they wish to, environmentalists say.

“If you had told me two years ago 2020 would begin and end without any seismic air gun testing I would have been elated; that’s why I’m elated now,” Steve Mashuda, the Seattle-based managing attorney for oceans at Earthjustice, said by telephone.

The San Francisco-based nonprofit is one of several environmental nonprofits that in December 2018 sued in a South Carolina federal court to stop the tests — twice as loud as a jet engine — sought from New Jersey’s Cape

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Federal court orders change to mail-in voting while Missouri’s high court affirms law | Law and order

The attorney general’s office told the court that suspending the notarization requirement after thousands of people already have requested ballots could be confusing and grant one group of voters a privilege that others did not have.

The case before the state Supreme Court is an appeal of a decision last month by Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem, who ruled against the plaintiffs. Beetem wrote that the evidence showed that election authorities provided “a safe voting experience” during the August primary and “will continue to do so in the upcoming general election.”

Supreme Court Judge Paul Wilson concurred with the majority. In a separate decision, he said the Legislature could have removed the notarization requirement, but didn’t.

“(T)his Court’s role is to construe the law that was passed, not to lament the laws that were not passed,” Wilson wrote.

Absentee voting began Sept. 22. An estimated 364,000 absentee ballots have

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NYC should replace 9/11 funds erroneously taken by federal government, Mnuchin tells de Blasio

WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin has a message for ailing 9/11 New York City firefighters whose funding his agency has withheld: We’re not giving your money back — go ask NYC.

For years, the U.S. Treasury Department has withheld nearly $4 million from the Fire Department of New York’s World Trade Center Health Program to satisfy still-unexplained debts that other, unrelated city agencies have with the federal government.

Mnuchin sent a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio on Thursday saying that the city should make up the shortfall. And if the city doesn’t pay up, Mnuchin threatened to take other federal health care funding meant for New York, and give that to the Fire Department instead.

“We agree it is unfair to burden FDNY with delinquent debts of other NYC government entities. The City government should directly reimburse FDNY,” Mnuchin wrote.

And if de Blasio refuses, Mnuchin said the

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Perdue’s Trump advocacy broke law, federal watchdog says

From staff and news services
Published 12:41 p.m. CT Oct. 9, 2020 | Updated 12:43 p.m. CT Oct. 9, 2020

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At a stop in Radcliffe, US Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue announced he is designating 18 counties as primary natural disaster areas making them eligible for loans.

Des Moines Register

A federal watchdog agency has concluded that U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue violated the law in advocating for the reelection of President Donald Trump during an August official visit to North Carolina.

The news came as Perdue was visiting Mason City and Ankeny on Thursday to make an announcement on new grants to promote the use of ethanol — a key issue for farmers in Iowa, a hotly contested state in the presidential race.

The Office of Special Counsel called on Perdue to reimburse the government for costs associated with his participation in the North Carolina event.

Former Iowa Lt.

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Illinois governor says federal government should help bars and restaurants

Bars and restaurants throughout Illinois continue to struggle amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the state-imposed restrictions put in place to reduce the spread of the virus.



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The onset of colder weather is also looming, making it difficult for most businesses to serve patrons outdoors.

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During a virtual void-19 briefing on Wednesday as he continues to be in isolation, Gov. J.B. Pritzker said that bars and restaurants are a hotbed for the coronavirus.

“They are the ones that have been most impacted because the medical advice has been that we have to limit the capacity there more than in other places in order to limit the spread of the virus,” Pritzker said.

In an update last month, the Illinois Department of Public Health reported that 9 percent of outbreaks were attributed to bars and restaurants.

As Pritzker touted passing the 6 million mark

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Unions bet federal government ‘will bail out New York with massive amounts’ of cash

A third round of delayed pay increases for roughly 80,000 government workers has raised questions about how the state will close its estimated $14 billion budget gap absent further federal relief and without raising taxes.

Pay raises scheduled for April, July, and September will be delayed another 90 days, after which the state will reassess whether they can be implemented, Freeman Klopott of the Division of the Budget told the Times Union in a statement.

COVID-19-related lockdowns have added to steep losses in tax collections and state revenues.

“The governor’s action is the bare minimum,” Ken Girardin, a fellow and director of strategic initiatives at the Empire Center, told The Center Square by email. “The unions have generally bet that the federal government will bail out New York with massive amounts of unrestricted cash.”

The state has not renewed service contracts and instituted a hiring freeze. But it has not

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Fusion energy needs smart federal government regulation

Creating new sources of sustainable, reliable and zero-carbon energy is a critical national security question and may prove to be an existential threat to humanity. Investors are rushing to fund clean-tech startups that promise to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Perhaps the most transformative of those new, clean energy technologies is fusion energy. 

Leveraging almost 100 years of scientific research, fusion is now approaching commercial viability. Although it sounds like science fiction, scientists have been able to create fusion in the lab for decades, but it has always used more energy than it creates. Today, many businesses, universities and even nations around the globe are racing to demonstrate an energy-positive sustained fusion reaction. Some of our members in the Fusion Industry Association (FIA) hope to demonstrate fusion above the break-even point within the next few years. 

For decades, nuclear power plants have played a critical role in

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Florida official says state and federal law enforcement found no ‘malicious activity’ in voter site outage: reports

Investigators looking into Florida’s voter registration website crash Monday reportedly found “no evidence of interference or malicious activity” in connection with the fiasco, which prompted officials to extend the registration deadline to Tuesday evening.

Florida Secretary of State Laurel M. Lee said Monday that the Online Voter Registration system went out “for about 15 minutes” due to an influx of web traffic. It was supposed to be the last day of voter registrations, with a midnight deadline.

But on Tuesday, after meeting with Gov. Ron DeSantis, Lee’s office said the deadline would be extended until 7 p.m. for both online and in-person voter registration.

FLORIDA EXTENDS VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE AFTER WEBSITE CRASH

Voters could also turn in their registration to the offices of their local county elections supervisors, tax collectors, and transportation offices or through the mail postmarked by Oct. 6.

In a statement, Lee said the outage stemmed from

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