Whistle-Blowing Scientist Quits Government With Final Broadside

WASHINGTON — Rick Bright, a senior vaccine scientist who said he was demoted this spring for complaining about “cronyism” and political interference in science, resigned his final government post on Tuesday, saying he had been sidelined and left with nothing to do.

In a new addendum to the whistle-blower complaint he filed in May, Dr. Bright’s lawyers say officials at the National Institutes of Health, where he worked after his demotion, rejected his idea for a national coronavirus testing strategy “because of political considerations.” He also accused them of ignoring his request to join the $10 billion effort to fast-track a coronavirus vaccine, known as Operation Warp Speed.

“I long to serve the American people by using my skills to fight this pandemic,” Dr. Bright wrote on Sept. 25 to Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the institutes, noting that he had 25 years of experience in vaccine development. “The

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Brexit: Government Brexit plan gets MPs’ final backing

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PA Media

MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

Read More

Brexit: Government plan gets MPs’ final backing

FlagsImage copyright
PA Media

MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

Read More