Mississippi to vote on Jim Crow-era law designed to secure ‘white supremacy’ in state politics

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking month-long series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.

Mississippi voters have never elected a Black candidate to statewide office, despite having the largest proportional Black population of any U.S. state at nearly 40%.

Advocates hope an amendment on the November ballot may change that.

Mississippi is the only state with a multistep process for electing statewide positions like governor, attorney general and secretary of state. Its electoral college-like voting system was designed by white framers in Southern Reconstruction with the intent to disenfranchise minority voters and uphold white power in politics.

PHOTO: Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.

Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.

Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar

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Mississippi to decide fate of Jim Crow-era law designed to secure ‘white supremacy’



a close up of a newspaper


© Provided by ABC News



This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking month-long series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.



a man standing in front of a box: Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.


© Sarah Warnock/Clarion Ledger via USA Today Network, FILE
Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.

Mississippi voters have never elected a Black candidate to statewide office, despite having the largest proportional Black population of any U.S. state at nearly 40%.

Advocates hope an amendment on the November ballot may change that.

Mississippi is the only state with a multistep process for electing statewide positions like governor, attorney general and secretary of state. Its electoral college-like voting system was designed by white framers in Southern Reconstruction with the intent to disenfranchise minority voters and uphold white power in politics.



a person standing in front of a box: Pamela Shaw casts her vote in the primary election at a polling location in Jackson, Miss, Mar 10, 2020.


© Sarah Warnock/Clarion

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