Kyrgyz parliament set to meet, discuss new government amid unrest

BISHKEK (Reuters) – Kyrgyzstan’s parliament was set to meet on Saturday and potentially vote in a new government to end a power vacuum in the strategically important Central Asian nation which has been gripped by unrest since a contested Oct. 4 election.

The former Soviet republic of 6.5 million hosts a Russian military airbase and serves as a hub for trade with neighbouring China. It is also home to a large Canadian-owned mining operation.

Military checkpoints were put up overnight around capital Bishkek and armoured personnel carriers were spotted in the city after President Sooronbai Jeenbekov ordered troops to deploy and re-establish order amid flare-ups of violence.

The parliament planned to gather in the presidential residence on the outskirts of Bishkek, after its own offices were ransacked by protesters who seized key government buildings on Tuesday.

Russia, which exerts significant influence on Kyrgyzstan, this week described the situation as “chaos”.

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Kyrgyz President Declares Martial Law in Capital Amid Protests

(Bloomberg) — Kyrgyz President Sooronbay Jeenbekov declared martial law in the capital, Bishkek, Friday in an attempt to curtail the political chaos that has rocked the country since disputed parliamentary elections.

A curfew from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. will be in place until the state of emergency ends on Oct. 21, according to an order from the presidential administration. The head of Kyrgyzstan’s Interior Ministry was appointed the city’s commandant.

The move was an attempt to reassert Jeenbekov’s authority after demonstrators protesting the results of Sunday’s election overran the parliament building and released a former president from jail. Parties close to Jeenbekov had dominated the disputed vote.

Street protests were continuing Friday, according to videos posted by local news website 24.kg.

Earlier Friday, Jeenbekov dissolved the government and fired the head of the military and the chairman of the security council in a series of executive orders.

In

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Kyrgyz opposition groups make rival power grabs after toppling government

By Olga Dzyubenko



a person sitting on a bench: Members of voluntary people's patrol guard the government headquarters building in Bishkek


© Reuters/VLADIMIR PIROGOV
Members of voluntary people’s patrol guard the government headquarters building in Bishkek

BISHKEK (Reuters) – The Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan slid deeper into chaos as rival opposition factions made grabs for power on Wednesday, a day after they stormed government buildings, forcing the prime minister to quit and a parliamentary election to be annulled.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People attend a rally following post-election protests during which opposition groups took control of most of the government's apparatus, in Bishkek


© Reuters/VLADIMIR PIROGOV
People attend a rally following post-election protests during which opposition groups took control of most of the government’s apparatus, in Bishkek

Left isolated by the resignation of Prime Minister Kubatbek Boronov’s government late on Tuesday, President Sooronbai Jeenbekov called for all party talks in a statement on Wednesday, reiterating his willingness to mediate.



a group of people performing on a counter: Protesters are seen inside the parliament building, known as the White House, in Bishkek


© Reuters/TWITTER/GRAFECRISTO
Protesters are seen inside the parliament building, known as the White House, in Bishkek

Two presidents have been overthrown in Kyrgyzstan in the past 15 years, and longtime ally Russia expressed

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Kyrgyz opposition make rival power grabs after toppling government

The Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan slid deeper into chaos as rival opposition factions made grabs for power on Wednesday, a day after they stormed government buildings, forcing the prime minister to quit and a parliamentary election to be annulled.

Left isolated by the resignation of Prime Minister Kubatbek Boronov’s government late on Tuesday, President Sooronbai Jeenbekov called for all party talks during an interview with the BBC.

Two presidents have been overthrown in Kyrgyzstan in the past 15 years, and longtime ally Russia expressed concern as protests spread across the country, which borders China, in the wake of Sunday’s vote.

Kyrgyzstan hosts a Russian military airbase and a large Canadian-owned gold mining operation.

Late on Tuesday, its parliament agreed to nominate opposition politician Sadyr Zhaparov — freed from prison by protesters just hours earlier — for prime minister, but an angry mob then broke into the hotel where it

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Kyrgyz protesters break into government headquarters: media

ALMATY (Reuters) – People protesting the results of a parliamentary election in Kyrgyzstan broke into government and state security headquarters early Tuesday, local news websites Akipress and 24.kg reported.

The thousands-strong protests broke out after two establishment parties, one of which is close to President Sooronbai Jeenbekov, swept Sunday’s vote, according to preliminary results.

Police had dispersed the rally late on Monday, but protesters returned to the central square of capital Bishkek hours later and broke into the building that houses both the president and parliament.

Protesters then broke into the headquarters of State Committee on National Security and freed former president Almazbek Atambayev, who was sentenced to a lengthy prison term this year on corruption charges after falling out with his successor, President Sooronbai Jeenbekov.

Jeenbekov said late on Monday he would meet on Tuesday with the leaders of all parties that had taken part in the election.

The

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Kyrgyz protesters take government house, free ex-leader after after post-vote clashes

Protesters seized Kyrgyzstan’s seat of government and freed a jailed former president on Tuesday after demonstrations against an election marred by vote-buying accusations spiralled into violent clashes with police.

Opposition supporters hit the streets of the capital Bishkek the previous evening to demand the resignation of pro-Russian President Sooronbay Jeenbekov and a re-run of Sunday’s poll. 

Police used water cannon, stun grenades and tear gas to disperse protesters attempting to force their way through the gates of the building that houses the former Soviet republic’s parliament and presidential offices. 

Photos published by Radio Free Europe later showed protesters strolling around the building unhindered. 

A crowd of around 2,000 people then forced their way into the nearby National Security Committee building, where former president Almazbek Atambayev was jailed.

Adil Turdukuov, an activist and ally of Atambayev who witnessed the release said the ex-leader was freed “without force or use of any

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