Unrest in Avon? Trump’s message of law and order, loaded with racist undertones, takes aim at safety and security in Connecticut suburbs

In the eyes of President Donald Trump and some Republicans, electing the Democrats in 2020 would lead to a clear and frightening outcome: tranquil suburbs in Connecticut and elsewhere would be overrun by crime, violent protests, and social decay.

It’s an old message with a new twist, fueled by the backlash against Black Lives Matter protests and demonstrations this summer that were largely peaceful in Connecticut, but turned violent in Portland, Chicago, Los Angeles and other cities.

Referring to the prospect of civil unrest, David X. Sullivan, a Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District, told the Courant that he is “concerned about Avon, Farmington and Simsbury becoming as violent as Portland, New York and Chicago.”

Unrest in Avon?

Trump’s law and order message and its many versions may sound far-fetched to some. But there is a racist undertone to the rhetoric that has proven effective in the past, said

Read More

In a state known for ‘law and order,’ Texas Republicans struggle to make the message stick

But there are signs the message has fallen flat, even with some suburban Republican voters who say the efforts to mirror President Trump’s demonization of “Democratic-run cities” and social justice demonstrations needlessly stoke fear and exacerbate political divisiveness.

In the longtime Republican stronghold of Collin County, home to two of the nation’s most competitive state legislative contests, Republican candidates and supporters have spotlighted rising crime rates in neighboring Dallas, where homicides are hovering near a 10-year high. But lifelong Republican Jim Murry said he shakes his head — or shouts at his television screen — when he hears Abbott or Trump rail against “violent” protesters or accuse Democrats of wanting to decimate local police forces.

“To me, it’s all unfounded fear,” said Murry, 64, as he stood among his neighbors’ spacious homes and manicured lawns in west Plano, a Dallas suburb. The idea that Democrats “are going to ruin the

Read More

Society’s ‘man up’ message fueling suicide among men

By Tony Mushoborozi

On July 2, Hussein Walugembe, a boda-boda cyclist from Masaka, walked into Masaka Central Police Station, doused himself in petrol and set himself ablaze. In a news report published by this paper, Walugembe’s motorcycle had reportedly been impounded for violating curfew guidelines. According to his friends,  since this was his only source of income, he decided to commit suicide after failing to reach an agreement with the officers in charge on when he would get his motorcycle back.

Two months before the incident, on May 12, another story was published by several media houses in the country. A 30-year-old man in Kabale District had committed suicide by hanging after he allegedly failed to raise Shs1,000 to buy salt for his family. 

Justina Nakimuli, a psychiatric specialist based in Manchester, United Kingdom, who also runs a private practice in Kampala, says men are more prone to suicidal behaviour

Read More

As Donald Trump’s Law-and-Order Message Fails In Minnesota, Campaign Moves Money to Must-Win Florida

The release on bail of Derek Chauvin, the officer charged in George Floyd’s death, prompted yet another surge of unrest in Minnesota. But even as demonstrations filled the streets for a second night, Donald Trump’s campaign was pulling ad money out of the state. The president’s law-and-order message, which campaign officials had expected to resonate in the protest-torn state, wasn’t working.



a group of people posing for the camera: Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.


© KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images
Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.

Trump taking down the fabled “blue wall” of Rust Belt states—Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan—was the most shocking component of his historic upset in 2016. Just as unexpected, to Democrats, pollsters and political pundits, was this: he nearly won Minnesota, falling just 1.5 points behind Hillary Clinton in what was supposed to be the bluest of blue

Read More

The Latest: Pence to press ‘law and order’ message at debate

WASHINGTON — The Latest on the 2020 presidential election (all times local):

7:10 p.m.

Republican Mike Pence will press the Trump campaign’s “law and order” message at the vice presidential debate against Democrat Kamala Harris.

Pence’s guests in the debate hall Wednesday night will include Ann Marie Dorn, the widow of retired St. Louis police captain David Dorn, who was shot to death on June 2 after a violent night of protests.

President Donald Trump and his campaign have seized on the scattered violence that has broken out amid otherwise largely peaceful protests demanding racial justice. Trump has wrongly claimed that such violence has been condoned by his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, and has warned it will continue if Biden wins in November.

Ann Marie Dorn also spoke at the Republican National Convention.

Pence will also be joined by the parents of Kayla Mueller, a humanitarian aid worker who was

Read More

Harvard poll finds Americans receptive to law-and-order message

Voters want to see immigrants with criminal records deported, want to see rioters and looters arrested and prosecuted, and want to see stiffer border security, according to a new Harvard CAPS-Harris poll that suggests there’s ample room for President Trump to sell his law-and-order message — if he can break through questions about his character.

More than two-thirds hold a favorable opinion of police, compared to 51% for the Black Lives Matter movement. Antifa, the left-wing “ant-fascist” movement, has just 14% approval.

Voters also expect a second wave of coronavirus cases, but most still want their states to try to remain open anyway, rather than return to the crippling lockdowns of the spring, the poll found.

“Trump wins the issue vote, Biden wins on character,” the pollsters said, summing up the results of the survey of 1,314 registered voters, taken Sept. 22-24.

On the border, 72% said it needs to

Read More

Haiti – Politic : Message of Peace and Union to all sectors of national life


Haiti – Politic : Message of Peace and Union to all sectors of national life
22/09/2020 11:36:40

Monday September 21, as part of the celebration of the International Day of Peace, dedicated to harmony between peoples and communities, Colombe Émile Jessy Menos the Minister Delegate to the Prime Minister in charge of Human Rights and the Fight against Extreme Poverty sends out a message of peace and union to all sectors of national life.

“Shaping Peace together the theme of this day, emphasizes the role that each of us is called to play in building a Haitian society based on harmony and respect for rights and freedoms. Let’s learn to live fraternally without exclusivity.

Whatever our divergencies, whatever our differences, we must live and work together to establish this climate of Peace so desired by our ancestors. Peace, the engine of economic and social development of any society.

Minister Menos,

Read More

Discrimination in the Federal Government: A Message to You

Unlawful discrimination (racial, gender, age, etc.) is on the rise in the federal government. Many federal workers are treated less favorably than others because of their membership in a protected group, despite the federal government’s claim of being non-discriminatory. The federal government, with roughly two million civilian employees, is one of the nation’s largest employers. The federal government’s equal employment opportunity policy informs that the United States Government does not discriminate in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, political affiliation, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, disability and genetic information, age, membership in an employee organization, or any other non-merit factor. Nevertheless, the number of federal employees filing discrimination complaints increases annually. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the backlog of discrimination cases has lead to an average time of one year to complete investigations and close cases. The processing of discrimination complaints … Read More