Unrest in Avon? Trump’s message of law and order, loaded with racist undertones, takes aim at safety and security in Connecticut suburbs

In the eyes of President Donald Trump and some Republicans, electing the Democrats in 2020 would lead to a clear and frightening outcome: tranquil suburbs in Connecticut and elsewhere would be overrun by crime, violent protests, and social decay.

It’s an old message with a new twist, fueled by the backlash against Black Lives Matter protests and demonstrations this summer that were largely peaceful in Connecticut, but turned violent in Portland, Chicago, Los Angeles and other cities.

Referring to the prospect of civil unrest, David X. Sullivan, a Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District, told the Courant that he is “concerned about Avon, Farmington and Simsbury becoming as violent as Portland, New York and Chicago.”

Unrest in Avon?

Trump’s law and order message and its many versions may sound far-fetched to some. But there is a racist undertone to the rhetoric that has proven effective in the past, said

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How Trump lost the law and order debate

For months, in the midst of protests against racial injustice and a worsening global pandemic, President Trump has sought to portray his Democratic rivals as lawless rioters bent on mob rule.



a group of people standing around a fire: On The Trail: How Trump lost the law and order debate


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On The Trail: How Trump lost the law and order debate

His presidency, Trump has insisted, is the only thing standing between a wave of crime and chaos. Speakers at the Republican National Convention this year – including a St. Louis couple who was charged last week with felony counts after they waved weapons at protesters – repeatedly invoked the threat of violence looming over American cities.

But Americans think otherwise. In poll after poll, a plurality – and in many cases a majority – say Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden would be better equipped than Trump to handle law and order or crime and violence.

A CNN survey released last week asked respondents which presidential

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In a state known for ‘law and order,’ Texas Republicans struggle to make the message stick

But there are signs the message has fallen flat, even with some suburban Republican voters who say the efforts to mirror President Trump’s demonization of “Democratic-run cities” and social justice demonstrations needlessly stoke fear and exacerbate political divisiveness.

In the longtime Republican stronghold of Collin County, home to two of the nation’s most competitive state legislative contests, Republican candidates and supporters have spotlighted rising crime rates in neighboring Dallas, where homicides are hovering near a 10-year high. But lifelong Republican Jim Murry said he shakes his head — or shouts at his television screen — when he hears Abbott or Trump rail against “violent” protesters or accuse Democrats of wanting to decimate local police forces.

“To me, it’s all unfounded fear,” said Murry, 64, as he stood among his neighbors’ spacious homes and manicured lawns in west Plano, a Dallas suburb. The idea that Democrats “are going to ruin the

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Trump Was ‘Pandering’ to Black and Latinx Voters in ‘Law and Order’ Protest: Fox Host Arthel Neville

President Donald Trump was “pandering” to Black and Latinx Americans during his White House speech on Saturday in a bid to get their votes just weeks before the election, Fox News anchor Arthel Neville told viewers.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC.


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U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC.

The president stood on a balcony to address several hundred supporters gathered on the South Lawn on Saturday afternoon in his first in-person event since he revealed he had tested positive for coronavirus.

The rally was organized by Black conservative commentator Candace Owens and former Arizona police officer Brandon Tatum’s Blexit Foundation.

Touted by the White House as a “peaceful protest for law and order,” Trump told the crowd: “You just marched to the White House because you understand, to protect the

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Trump returns to public events with ‘law and order’ speech at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a swift and full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump returned to public events on Saturday with a brief “law and order” speech from a White House balcony.



a man standing next to a clock: Photograph: REX/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

In a closely-watched first public appearance at a live event just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay, the president delivered an 18-minute scripted address to a crowd on the South Lawn. It had been billed as “2,000 invited guests” but in reality a gathering of about 500 mostly young flag-waving supporters, some of whom appeared to be not properly wearing masks.



Donald Trump standing in front of a building: Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.


© Photograph: REX/Shutterstock
Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week

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Trump gives in-person remarks at ‘peaceful protest for Law & Order’



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Trump Holds Event On Law And Order At White House

WASHINGTON, DC — Supporters lined up outside the White House South Lawn on Saturday, hoping to catch a glimpse of President Donald Trump’s first public event since he tested positive for COVID-19 just over a week ago.

Thousands are expected to attend what the Trump administration is billing as “a peaceful protest for law & order.” In an address scheduled to start around 2 p.m. ET, Trump will speak from the White House balcony, The Associated Press reported.

Watch live using the above video player or on the White House’s YouTube channel.

RELATED: Thousands Expected At Trump’s First Public Event Since Virus

All attendees were required to bring masks or masks would be provided for them, and also would be given temperature checks and asked to fill out a brief questionnaire.

Attendees were “strongly encouraged” to follow CDC guidelines, which include mask-wearing and social distancing, AP reported.

Saturday’s event comes

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Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in

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Trump to Go Ahead With ‘Law and Order’ Protest Amid D.C. Mayor’s Ban on ‘Mass Gatherings’

President Donald Trump is expected to give in-person remarks during an event today on the South Lawn of the White House, despite his coronavirus diagnosis and restrictions on mass gatherings that remain in effect for Washington, D.C.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.


© Win McNamee/Getty
President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.

The president’s schedule for today suggests that he will deliver “remarks at a peaceful protest for law and order” at 2 p.m., confirming the ABC News report yesterday which said Trump was expected to address attendees from a White House balcony.

‘Get Out There’: Trump Removes Face Mask For Photo Op As He Returns To White House

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If it goes ahead, it will mark the president’s first in-person event since announcing last

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Federal court orders change to mail-in voting while Missouri’s high court affirms law | Law and order

The attorney general’s office told the court that suspending the notarization requirement after thousands of people already have requested ballots could be confusing and grant one group of voters a privilege that others did not have.

The case before the state Supreme Court is an appeal of a decision last month by Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem, who ruled against the plaintiffs. Beetem wrote that the evidence showed that election authorities provided “a safe voting experience” during the August primary and “will continue to do so in the upcoming general election.”

Supreme Court Judge Paul Wilson concurred with the majority. In a separate decision, he said the Legislature could have removed the notarization requirement, but didn’t.

“(T)his Court’s role is to construe the law that was passed, not to lament the laws that were not passed,” Wilson wrote.

Absentee voting began Sept. 22. An estimated 364,000 absentee ballots have

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