Michigan law enforcement on alert in response to ‘plan to target and kill police’

Michigan law enforcement is on high alert after the FBI revealed an alleged plot by extremist groups to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer also involved a “plan to target and kill police.”

Vehicle protests at Michigan Capitol over Gov. Whitmer stay home order

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“We’re cautious. We’re absolutely more careful,” said First Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police. “This is one of the tactics these anti-government, domestic terrorism groups use. Law enforcement is the face of the government. If you’re mad at the government, you’re mad at the police.”

The alleged plot was unveiled last Thursday when the U.S. Department of Justice charged six men with conspiracy to kidnap Whitmer, which authorities said they wanted to carry out before Election Day. On the same day, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel brought charges against seven other men that included supporting terrorism, gang membership, and possession of

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Extremist group’s plot to kidnap governor included plan to kill police

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‘Operation Gridlock’ aims to jam the roads around the Michigan Capitol in Lansing to object to restrictions in the stay-home order.

Detroit Free Press

Michigan law enforcement is on high alert after the FBI revealed an alleged plot by extremist groups to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer also involved a “plan to target and kill police.”

“We’re cautious. We’re absolutely more careful,” said First Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police. “This is one of the tactics these anti-government, domestic terrorism groups use. Law enforcement is the face of the government. if you’re mad at the government, you’re mad at the police.”

The alleged plot was unveiled last Thursday when the U.S. Department of Justice charged six men with conspiracy to kidnap Whitmer, which authorities said they wanted to carry out before Election Day. On the same day, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel brought charges against seven other men

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How much government money does Trump plan to spend on his reelection?

You may be curious why the administration doesn’t simply take its time and make sure that the program, which would surely be received gratefully by senior citizens, is implemented effectively and smoothly. Except you’re probably not actually curious about that because you recognize what’s happening: Trump wants this done before Election Day to capitalize on that goodwill in the form of votes.

None of this is subtle. Sure, a White House spokesman told Politico that the plan “has nothing to do with politics.” It’s just that the team is trying to figure out how to make it happen before Nov. 3, a date with no special significance whatsoever.

When this was first proposed, the New York Times reported that pharmaceutical companies balked at the idea of distributing what they referred to pejoratively as “Trump cards”: cash handouts tied explicitly to the president. But Trump’s team made very clear that the

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Premier League urge UK government to plan for fans’ return

The Premier League and the leaders of governing bodies across English soccer have pleaded with the UK government to speed up plans for fans to return to stadiums amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

[ MORE: How to watch PL in the USA ]

Premier League chief executive Richard Masters was joined by David Baldwin (EFL chief executive), Mark Bullingham (FA chief executive) and Kelly Simmons (FA director of women’s professional game) as they penned an open letter with regards to fans returning to stadiums for the first time since March.

The statement urged the UK government to allow fans back in stadiums soon, as 11 test events were successful in August and September but more test events were canceled due to a huge spike in COVID-19 cases in September and October.

Fans were due to be able to return in small numbers from October 1 but that was canceled.

Restarting the

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UK government puts temporary block on coal mine plan

The construction of the UK’s first coal mine in more than 30 years has been suspended by the government after ministers came under pressure over their commitments to tackling climate change.

Robert Jenrick, the housing secretary, said he reserved the right to veto planning permission for the site after Cumbria county council approved the building of the pit on Friday. 

The UK has promised to be carbon neutral by 2050 and burning coal at the proposed plant would emit 8m tonnes of the greenhouse gas annually, environmental groups say.

Mr Jenrick’s intervention means that approval is suspended until he decides if it should go ahead.

The £160m Woodhouse Colliery near Whitehaven, in north-west England, would create 500 jobs in an area reliant on the nuclear and seasonal tourism industries.

West Cumbria Mining, the developer, said the coking coal will be used in the steel and chemical industry and displace imports,

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Brexit: Government Brexit plan gets MPs’ final backing

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MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

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Brexit: Government plan gets MPs’ final backing

FlagsImage copyright
PA Media

MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

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Johnson’s Law-Breaking Brexit Plan Faces Defeat, Ministers Fear

(Bloomberg) — Boris Johnson is braced for defeat in Parliament over his controversial plan to re-write the Brexit withdrawal agreement, a blow that could throw negotiations with the European Union into chaos at a critical time.



a statue of Boris Johnson in a suit standing in front of a building


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Boris Johnson

The draft legislation has been attacked by all five of Johnson’s living predecessors as U.K. prime minister because it breaches international law by reneging on parts of the Brexit deal he signed with the European Union. Two senior legal officials have already quit the government in protest.

Johnson eventually bowed to pressure from rebels in his own party and gave Parliament a veto on whether to use the most controversial powers in the legislation.

The Internal Market Bill is expected to clear the House of Commons on Tuesday — but it will then move to the House of Lords, where Johnson’s Conservative Party doesn’t have a majority. Ministers expect

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Brexit: MPs to vote again on government’s plan

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PA Media

MPs are set to vote once again on Tuesday whether to back the government’s plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers have agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation is expected to pass before going to the House of Lords.

But former Prime Minister Theresa May has said she “cannot support” it.

It is not known whether Mrs May – one of several Conservative MPs who have raised concerns over possibly undoing parts of a treaty signed with the EU – will actually vote against her successor Boris Johnson’s government.

The parliamentary debate comes as the EU and the UK begin a ninth – and final – scheduled round of talks aimed at securing a trade deal.

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