Polish farmers protest planned animal welfare law

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Thousands of angry farmers chanting anti-government slogans protested Tuesday in Warsaw against draft legislation that would ban fur farms, religious slaughter for export and the use of animals for entertainment and in circuses.

Towing a life-size figure of a cow, the farmers gathered before the parliament building where the Senate is debating the draft that has divided the ruling camp as well as the opposition. It has also angered farmers, who until now have been devoted supporters of the conservative government.

Critics of the bill say it threatens the livelihoods of farmers breeding mink and other animals for fur and well as for ritual slaughter, and would put an end to a large sector of Poland’s exports.

The main ruling party proposed the bill, arguing it was to protect animals’ wellbeing, but the controversies almost destroyed the governing right-wing coalition as many of its lawmakers refused

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White Supremacist Group Linked To Mosque Bombing Planned Violent Revolution Against Government

An Illinois-based white supremacist group linked to a mosque attack and an attempted abortion clinic bombing had stockpiled guns and explosives to wage a revolution against the federal government, according to reports.

Michael Hari, the suspected leader of the White Rabbit Militia group, is due to go on trial in connection to the bombing of the Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, Minnesota. No one was killed or injured during the attack, which took place just before morning prayers on August 5, 2017.

According to court documents, the group carried out the attack on the mosque “because Hari and his men hated Islam and wanted Muslims out of the United States.”

Hari is also accused of the attempted bombing of the Women’s Health Practice abortion clinic in Champaign, Illinois, on November 7, 2017. Two other men—Joe Morris and Michael McWhorter—have already pleaded guilty for their role

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Nigeria’s main unions suspend planned strike after government talks

By Angela Ukomadu

LAGOS, Sept 28 (Reuters)Nigerian labour unions agreed with the government on Monday to suspend a planned strike over fuel and power price rises hours before businesses were due to grind to a halt, the labour minister and trade unions said.

The Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC), which represents millions of workers across most sectors of Africa’s biggest economy, including parts of the oil industry, last week announced its plans to embark on a general strike.

Nigeria cut costly subsidies in September to allow the petrol price to be determined by the market and increased the power tariff. President Muhammadu Buhari had said Nigeria could no longer afford the subsidies but the unions said a reversal of price hikes was needed to avert the strike.

The strike was due to begin on Monday but Labour and Employment Minister Festus Keyamo said in a statement, posted on

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