Unrest in Avon? Trump’s message of law and order, loaded with racist undertones, takes aim at safety and security in Connecticut suburbs

In the eyes of President Donald Trump and some Republicans, electing the Democrats in 2020 would lead to a clear and frightening outcome: tranquil suburbs in Connecticut and elsewhere would be overrun by crime, violent protests, and social decay.

It’s an old message with a new twist, fueled by the backlash against Black Lives Matter protests and demonstrations this summer that were largely peaceful in Connecticut, but turned violent in Portland, Chicago, Los Angeles and other cities.

Referring to the prospect of civil unrest, David X. Sullivan, a Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District, told the Courant that he is “concerned about Avon, Farmington and Simsbury becoming as violent as Portland, New York and Chicago.”

Unrest in Avon?

Trump’s law and order message and its many versions may sound far-fetched to some. But there is a racist undertone to the rhetoric that has proven effective in the past, said

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U.K. Plans New Law to Undo Foreign Deals on Security Grounds

(Bloomberg) — Boris Johnson’s government is drawing up plans for a radical new law that would give ministers power to unravel foreign investments in U.K. companies — potentially casting major doubt on deals that have already been concluded — to stop hostile states gaining control over key assets.



a close up of a light pole: Pedestrians walk as the Tower Bridge stands beyond in London.


© Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
Pedestrians walk as the Tower Bridge stands beyond in London.

The National Security and Investment Bill is in the final stages of drafting and could be published later this month, according to people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity because the subject is sensitive.

It aims to cover deals in sectors such as defense and critical infrastructure, and will make provisions to protect sensitive intellectual property.

Among the most potentially controversial parts of the draft law is a proposal to allow the government to intervene retrospectively in circumstances where national security is an

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Academics warn of ‘chilling effect’ of Hong Kong security law | Higher education

Some of the world’s leading scholars on China have called for a united international front in defence of university freedoms, amid claims of an increased Chinese threat to academic inquiry since the passing of Hong Kong’s national security law.

Individual universities will be picked off unless there is a common agreement to resist Chinese state interference in academic research and teaching on China, a group of 100 academics including scholars in the US, UK, Australia and Germany say.

They highlight the threat posed by article 38 of the sweeping national security law, which states that the law is applicable to individuals who live outside the territory and individuals who do not come from there.

The law was imposed on Hong Kong by Beijing in June after more than a year of pro-democracy protests.

The academics say article 38 raises the unsettling prospect that students travelling through Hong Kong and China

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Ballet dancer could reskill with job in cyber security, suggests UK government ad | Oliver Dowden

The culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, has condemned a “crass” advertising campaign which suggested a ballet dancer could “reboot” their career by moving into cyber security.

The advert, part of the government’s Cyber First campaign, featured a young dancer tying up her ballet pumps alongside the caption: “Fatima’s next job could be in cyber (she just doesn’t know it yet).”

It adds the slogan: “Rethink. Reskill. Reboot.”

The poster, one of a series which featured people from a variety of other professions, was heavily criticised on social media, prompting the intervention from Dowden.

The government has been approached for more information about when the campaign launched.

Among the critics was the singer Darren Hayes, who posted on Twitter: “Stick with your dreams, don’t listen to this shit campaign written by people who, when not working, turn to the arts – music, tv, film, theatre, dance, photography, etc etc for joy. Making

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Dogs ‘kidnapped’ from Thane; case against security guard of housing society





© Provided by Hindustan Times


A case has been registered against a security guard of a housing society in Thane for allegedly kidnapping eight street dogs and leaving them at an unknown place in Ambernath. The role of the society members is under scrutiny. Ambernath police are yet to arrest anyone in the case, but investigation is on.

According to Ambernath police, two days ago, animal activists Archana Nair and Mukund Pande approached them with the complaint of eight street dogs being kidnapped. Members of the society allegedly took away these dogs and left them in a different area with the help of a security guard as these dogs were creating dirt inside the society.

Ambernath police station senior police inspector, S Dhumal, said, “We checked the CCTV footage and found three to four times the security guard has taken two dogs each time in an auto rickshaw somewhere. The

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security law ‘good for stability’



Edward Yau sitting at a desk in front of a window


© BBC


The controversial national security law (NSL) imposed by Beijing will boost rather than damage Hong Kong’s status as a global financial hub.

This is the view of Edward Yau, Hong Kong’s Secretary for Commerce.

In an interview with Talking Business Asia, Mr Yau said the one-country-two-systems arrangement with China would remain intact under the law.

The NSL came into effect in June after more than a year of protests sparked by a proposed extradition bill.

“I think the best judgment would be left to people who actually work here and see for themselves how things go,” he said.

“Particularly when we are going through a difficult time from the social unrest to Covid-19 and also heading towards a lot of uncertainty in the international economic political climate.”

The security law criminalises any act of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion.

A number of people have already been arrested under

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Motley Fool to Leave Hong Kong, Citing National Security Law

(Bloomberg) — Motley Fool, the investing news site, said it will shut its Hong Kong operations because of the growing uncertainty of doing business in the city.



a group of people in uniform: Riot police raise a purple flag warning protesters of actions that violate the new national security law, during a protest on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Riot police flooded Hong Kong streets on a tense National Day, a show of force intended to back up leader Carrie Lam's morning declaration that stability had returned to the Asian financial center.


© Bloomberg
Riot police raise a purple flag warning protesters of actions that violate the new national security law, during a protest on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Riot police flooded Hong Kong streets on a tense National Day, a show of force intended to back up leader Carrie Lam’s morning declaration that stability had returned to the Asian financial center.

The publication, which expanded into Hong Kong in 2018, made the decision because of the difficulty foreseeing how the company would fare in the city in the coming years in the wake of the turmoil that’s been gripping the financial hub since last year, Hayes Chan, lead analyst at Motley Fool Hong Kong, wrote on the

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Huawei Has Failed To Resolve Security Flaws, U.K. Government Report Says

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Huawei has failed to adequately resolve security flaws in the equipment used by the U.K. telecom networks, the British government’s cyber-spy agency said in an official report released a few months after the Chinese telecom equipment-maker was barred from the country’s 5G mobile networks over security concerns.

Key Facts

The report, prepared by a U.K. government board led by a member of the cyber-intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) found that there had been no evidence that the Chinese firm has made a significant shift on the matter, the BBC reported.

The report added that while some improvements were made by Huawei, the board could only provide “limited assurance that all risks to UK national security” could be mitigated in the long-term.

The U.K. government had initiated a review of Huawei’s

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Government Will Quash Oracle’s TikTok Deal If Security Requirements Not Met

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Wednesday that the government will shut down the TikTok app if its presumptive lead strategic investor, Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), does not enact stricter standards for the video-sharing app’s security.

One of the key demands from the government is that the code for the app is held within our borders. “All of the code will have to be in the United States. Oracle will be responsible for rebuilding the code, sanitizing the code, making sure it’s safe in their cloud, and … it’ll satisfy all of our requirements,” said Mnuchin in remarks made during a CNBC investor conference.

Under pressure from U.S. authorities to divest TikTok, the app’s owner — China-based ByteDance — reached a deal earlier this month for Oracle to buy a 12.5% stake in the business. Walmart (NYSE:WMT) will subsequently purchase a 7.5% TikTok stake.

Those holdings, combined with the 40% of ByteDance owned

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How HSBC got caught in a geopolitical storm over Hong Kong security law

HSBC has been a fixture of the Hong Kong economy for more than a century. However, its origins as a financial bridge between Asia and the west have placed it in the centre of a modern day geopolitical storm. Facing pressure to choose sides as Hong Kong is convulsed by the new security law imposed by Beijing and Donald Trump pursues a trade war with China, HSBC is in danger of finding itself without friends in either direction.

Headquartered in London, but dependent on Hong Kong and China for profits, HSBC has been affected by tensions between Washington and Beijing – and shareholder concern over its controversial acceptance of an authoritarian crackdown in its key market.

Last week that high-wire act was thrown into sharp relief when, despite HSBC’s public overtures to Beijing, a Chinese state-run newspaper reported the bank could be included on an official list – as

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