$75 million lawyers’ fee to stay frozen, SC judge rules

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Aerial view of the mixed oxide fuel factory at the Savannah River Site

A lawyer for a Columbia private law firm that received a $75 million fee from Attorney General Alan Wilson for legal work in a $600 million plutonium settlement told a state circuit judge on Wednesday that, under the law, no one can stop Wilson from paying out any size fee he wants to.

“The statute is clear: the attorney general can pay litigation costs, including attorneys’ fees,” said Rep. Todd Rutherford, D-Richland, who represented Columbia law firm Willoughby & Hoefer in a Wednesday hearing before state circuit Judge Alison Lee.

The only oversight to check Wilson’s payments to private lawyers to help with legal work is the will of the voters every four years who, if they don’t like what he’s doing, “can go to the polls and un-elect

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Kuwait’s emir asks government to stay on, prepare for elections

KUWAIT (Reuters) – Kuwait’s new emir has asked the cabinet to carry on its duties and prepare for parliamentary elections due this year after the prime minister handed in his government’s resignation, state news agency KUNA reported on Tuesday.

Parliament, which must approve the emir’s choice of crown prince, will end its term on Oct. 8, Speaker Marzouq al-Ghanim later said in remarks broadcast on state television.

Prime Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Khalid al-Sabah met Emir Sheikh Nawaf al-Ahmad al-Sabah, who assumed power last week, and in line with the constitution submitted the government’s resignation “to ensure ministerial responsibilities are held by those who enjoy the emir’s confidence”, KUNA said.

It said Sheikh Nawaf expressed his full confidence in the current cabinet, which was formed last December.

Sheikh Nawaf, 83, took the helm of the U.S.-allied OPEC member state following the death of his brother Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmed last Tuesday

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Swedish government faces battle to stay in power as labour talks fail

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Sweden’s minority government faces a potential rebellion by three small parties that keep it in power over plans to ease rules in the country’s rigid labour market.

Talks between trade unions and employer organisations broke down early on Thursday, handing the job of finding a solution to the Social Democrat-Green government. The government needs the backing of the Left Party as well as two small centre-right parties to pass its budgets.

Prime Minister Stefan Lofven had promised the two centre-right parties that if the unions and employers fail to agree new practices, the government would adopt proposals made by a commission to ease first-in-last-out rules, which critics say hamper companies’ ability to adapt to changing conditions.

Left Party leader Jonas Sjostedt said he would try to bring down the coalition if that plan goes ahead.

“Stefan Lofven cannot remain as prime minister if he plans to put

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