Prince William warns impact of climate crisis will be felt by society’s ‘most vulnerable’

The Duke of Cambridge has spoken out about the urgency of protecting the planet amid the ongoing climate crisis in a new TED talk.



Prince William, Duke of Cambridge sitting in a tree


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Filmed in the grounds of Windsor Castle, the talk forms part of Countdown, the first free and virtual TED Conference devoted entirely to environmental issues.

In the talk, Prince William stands alongside an oak tree and explains how it and many others in the grounds of Windsor Castle are thousands of years old.

“While these oaks have been growing, around 35 billion people have lived their lives on our planet,” he said.

“That’s 35 billion lifetimes worth of hope, love, fear and dreams. In that time, humankind has invented air travel, vaccines and computers. 

“We’ve explored every part of the globe, sequenced the human genome and even escaped Earth’s atmosphere. Our speed of innovation has been incredible. But so too has

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America’s most vulnerable families could face financial crisis if government relief fades away, Fed says

Stimulus checks and enhanced unemployment benefits that helped the poorest Americans weather the coronavirus pandemic are in danger of ending, throwing the finances of the most economically vulnerable into a tailspin. 



a hand holding up a sign: A protester blocks the street leading to the Washington, D.C., home of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., demanding the extension of unemployment aid, on July 22, 2020.


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A protester blocks the street leading to the Washington, D.C., home of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., demanding the extension of unemployment aid, on July 22, 2020.

The Federal Reserve’s “Update on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households,” a highly watched annual report that has been expanded this year to reflect the coronavirus pandemic, showed that government measures have helped low and middle-income families boost savings. 

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To that point, in July, 48% of families making less than $40,000 annually said they’d cover a $400 emergency expense with cash or an equivalent, up from 39% in October 2019, according to the most recent supplemental survey updated Sept. 22 by the Fed.

The

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