Mountain lion cub saved by San Diego Humane Society’s Project Wildlife, firefighters

An orphaned mountain lion cub who arrived at San Diego Humane Society’s Project Wildlife, Ramona Campus was in critical condition but is finally feeling better.

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, California — A mountain lion cub was spotted by firefighters from the Vista Grande Fire Station near a road in Idyllwild on Sept. 2, according to the San Diego Humane Society. She was semiconscious, extremely emaciated, dehydrated, weak and had tremors. The firefighters contacted the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, who reached out to San Diego Humane Society.

The organization’s Project Wildlife team went to work providing lifesaving treatment for the 10.5-pound cub, estimated to be only 14 weeks old. She received daily fluid therapy and medications. Within a couple of weeks, she progressed from three to five small, nutritious meals per day. They include ground proteins with milk replacer, to allow her body a slow transition to solid foods. 

We

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San Diego Humane Society’s Project Wildlife nurses dying mountain lion cub back to health

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) — A mountain lion cub rescued by the San Diego Humane Society continues to make great strides in its recovery.

The Humane Society said the female cub was found by Vista Grande Fire Station firefighters near a road in Idyllwild on Sept. 2. The cub was “semiconscious, extremely emaciated, dehydrated, weak and had tremors,” according to the Humane Society.

Under the care of the Humane Society’s Project Wildlife, the cub — believed to be 14 weeks old — has made significant health progress.

Through daily fluid therapy, medications, and proper meals, the Humane Society said the cub has increased her weight from 10.5 pounds to 22 pounds.

Christine Barton, the director of Operations & Wildlife Rehabilitation at the Humane Society’s Ramona campus, said, “With each passing day, she becomes more active and responsive and, though she still has some medical issues to overcome from being in such

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USGS Science at The Wildlife Society 2020 Conference

Symposia 

 

Monday 9/28 Sessions 

  • Sagebrush ecosystem (USGS image).

Anthropogenic Subsidies and Wildlife: The Good, the Bad, and the Unintended Consequences of Food and Shelter Subsidies for Wildlife 

Shawn O’Neil and others: Impacts of subsidized ravens on greater sage-grouse populations within sagebrush ecosystems of western North America. 

 

Long-Term Data Sets for Biodiversity Monitoring, Research, and Management 

John Sauer and others: Biometrics for Complex Long-Term Biodiversity Data Sets: Lessons from the Breeding Bird Survey 

John R. Sauer; William A. Link; James E. Hines–Most of our understanding of changes in avian biodiversity in North America is based on analysis of population change from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). The BBS provides data at spatial scales ranging from individual survey locations to continental, but analyses at all scales are complicated by the need to accommodate detectability issues during sampling and changes in sampling effort over space and time. Over the years of

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