Cineworld’s zero-hours staff face no pay as it confirms UK shutdown

Video: Still the world’s best boss? Five years on, the CEO who set $70,000 minimum pay (France 24)

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European Green Law Risks Delay as Leaders Seek to Defer Decision

(Bloomberg) —



a close up of a windmill: Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.


© Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.

A landmark law to strengthen European Union climate policies and make the 2050 goal of climate-neutrality irreversible risks falling off a fast-track approval process, as the bloc’s leaders take time to consider the economic impact of the unprecedented overhaul in the midst of the deepest recession on record.

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EU heads of government plan to discuss the draft measure at their two-day gathering next week but may stop short of supporting a more ambitious intermediate target for 2030, according to a draft of their joint communique seen by Bloomberg News. Their political endorsement, key for ministers to reach an agreement on the technical details of the law, and a stricter emissions-reduction goal for the next decade may come only in December.

“The European Council considers that the updated target

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Trupanion Partners with the Humane Society of the United States to Help Expectant Pet Parents …

SEATTLE, Oct. 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Trupanion, a leader in medical insurance for cats and dogs, will host a webinar on all you need to know about adopting a pet on Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 4pm PT/7pm ET. This is a first in a series of free webinars that will showcase everything potential new pet owners need to know about adopting a pet.

Trupanion has teamed up with the Humane Society of the United States  to bring together experts in the field to help potential new pet owners navigate the current pet adoption landscape.

“It’s clear that more and more people are turning to the companionship and comfort that pets can bring into their lives and their homes during these times,” said Dr. Steve Weinrauch, chief veterinary officer at Trupanion. “We saw this phenomenon early in our data with an increase in families adding pets to their

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Many Americans blame virus crisis on US government

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans blame the U.S. government instead of foreign nations for the coronavirus crisis in the United States, a rebuke to the Trump administration’s contention that China or other countries are most at fault, a new poll shows.



The White House is seen in the background as sign of the National COVID-19 Remembrance, event at The Ellipse outside of the White House, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington. More Americans blame the U.S. government than foreign powers for the coronavirus crisis in United States, rejecting the Trump administration’s contention that China is most at fault for the spread of the disease. That's according to a new poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)


© Provided by Associated Press
The White House is seen in the background as sign of the National COVID-19 Remembrance, event at The Ellipse outside of the White House, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington. More Americans blame the U.S. government than foreign powers for the coronavirus crisis in United States, rejecting the Trump administration’s contention that China is most at fault for the spread of the disease. That’s according to a new poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

The poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and

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east London shoppers on mask law

In some of Barking’s busiest shops on Monday, dozens of customers browsed the aisles maskless and unchallenged. Even some security guards – who are being asked by the east London borough’s council to enforce the law requiring masks indoors – had their faces uncovered.



icon: Photograph: Maureen McLean/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Maureen McLean/Rex/Shutterstock

Still others had pulled their coverings down to expose their noses and mouths as they browsed at close quarters in bustling supermarkets. Signage encouraging mask-wearing was sparse in many of the largest stores, while security presence in shop doorways was often barely noticeable.



a stop sign with graffiti on the side of a building: A mask sign in a shop window.


© Photograph: Maureen McLean/Rex/Shutterstock
A mask sign in a shop window.

Some shoppers told the Guardian they thought mask-wearing was critical to protect the public and supported a council-led crackdown – though they said police should be the enforcers, not shop workers.

“Personally, I think it is very important to wear a mask in shops

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Minister defends glitch that meant 16,000 missing coronavirus cases

Video: Test and Trace error: Minister unable to give number affected (PA Media)

Test and Trace error: Minister unable to give number affected

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Watch: Minister defends COVID-19 IT glitch



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© Yahoo News UK


A government minister has defended a technical glitch that caused almost 16,000 coronavirus cases to go unreported by saying: “We can’t change history.”

Public Health England (PHE) said 15,841 daily COVID-19 cases between 25 September and 2 October were left out of UK tallies.

It has caused a delay in tracking the contacts of people who tested positive.

But on Monday, work and pensions secretary Thérèse Coffey insisted: “Largely, test and trace is working very well.”

She told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I’m conscious something has gone wrong – we can’t change history, we can only change the future.”



Therese Coffey wearing a blue shirt: Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Therese Coffey arrives in Downing Street in central London to attend a Cabinet meeting as Parliament returns after summer recess amid the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic on 01 September, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by WIktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Therese Coffey arrives in Downing

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Court Upholds NYC Chokehold Law over Police Union Objections

A New York City law banning the use of chokeholds by police was upheld in a state court on Monday, following a challenge by police unions.

The legislation was signed by Mayor Bill de Blasio in July in reaction to massive demonstrations over the death of George Floyd, an African American man killed during his arrest by Minneapolis police officers. New York saw a related controversy in 2014, when an NYPD officer attempted to arrest resident Eric Garner, but killed Garner after placing him in a chokehold. Former NYPD commissioner James O’Neill fired the officer in 2019, following a recommendation from a police judge.

The New York City Council in July 2020 passed a law by councilman Rory Lancman, a Democrat from Queens, banning the use of chokeholds by a vote of 47-3. The law was upheld in a ruling by Judge Laurence L. Love of the 1st Judicial District

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Iran university professor and government advisor says ‘ordinary Iranians’ are praying for Trump’s recovery

In the days since President Donald Trump was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus and subsequently transferred to the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), one Tehran-based sociology professor has taken to social media to depict the “two groups” of Iranians “praying” for the infected commander in chief.

“It is not surprising that Donald Trump has been hospitalized for coronavirus; anyone, including the president of any country, can get sick. But it is very strange that those in Iran, among the people whose lives have suffered the most since Trump’s presidency, wish him well,” wrote Mohammad Fazeli, an Iranian sociologist and assistant professor at Tehran’s Shahid Beheshti University, who is also reported to serve as an advisor to the Iranian Minister of Energy and is the deputy director of the Research Center of the Presidential Office, in an Instagram post over the weekend. “I have seen people wishing Trump was

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More Americans blame the U.S. government than foreign nations for the country’s coronavirus crisis

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans blame the U.S. government instead of foreign nations for the coronavirus crisis in the United States, a rebuke to the Trump administration’s contention that China or other countries are most at fault, a new poll shows.

The poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was conducted before President Donald Trump tested positive for the virus Friday and was hospitalized. Trump has downplayed the severity and impact of the pandemic in recent months.

Although many see plenty of blame to go around and there’s a wide bipartisan divide over who is responsible, 56% of Americans say the U.S. government has substantial responsibility for the situation. That compares with 47% who place that much blame on the governments of other countries and only 39% who say the same about the World Health Organization.

“It

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Poll: More blame US government than foreign nations for coronavirus crisis

More than half of Americans blame the federal government for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a higher number than those who said they primarily blamed foreign governments such as China for the disease’s spread.

A poll conducted for the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 56 percent of respondents say the U.S. government carries “substantial” responsibility for the state of American COVID-19 outbreak, while just 47 percent said the same about leaders of foreign countries and 39 percent blamed the World Health Organization (WHO).

That comes after months of the Trump administration blaming both China’s government and the WHO for the scale of the U.S. outbreak, which has surpassed 7 million cases and more than 209,000 deaths. Top administration officials have claimed for months that the U.S. response was hampered by China’s supposed unwillingness to

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