Investors lead push for Australian business to cut emissions more than government forecasts

Major investors and super funds will lead a push for the private sector to make much deeper cuts in national greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 than planned by the Morrison government, including setting a target based on what scientists say is necessary.



a herd of cattle grazing on a dry grass field: Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

The newly created “climate league 2030” is calling on investors, insurers, banks and companies to sign up to a goal of reducing national emissions by at least 230m tonnes a year more than the government forecasts by 2030.

It is equivalent to about a 45% cut by 2030 compared with the 2005 benchmark used by the government – the minimum short-term target recommended by the government’s Climate Change Authority for Australia to play its part in keeping average global heating below 2C. They say action is needed now to put the country on a path to net zero emissions by

Read More

AU$7.4 billion tied up in active Australian government IT projects

The Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) in early 2017 was charged with looking into the structures of existing Australian government high-cost technology projects over AU$10 million.

Previously, the agency would provide status reports on these projects but that information is no longer provided freely.

Documents received by ZDNet under freedom of information (FOI) in January revealed there were 62 active tech-related projects above AU$10 million underway by the federal government, but the details surrounding how much has been spent to date — and how many of the projects went above the budgeted amount — were refused under the FOI.

See also: Government IT projects failing as DTA’s phone calls go unanswered

In its Annual Report 2019-20 [PDF] published this week, the DTA revealed the total amount of funds tied up in government IT projects, although that figure only accounts for funds as of January 2020.

As of January, AU$7.4 billion was

Read More

Australian YouTuber opens up on child’s deformity and fight to break stigma of difference in society


By Jackson Barron For Daily Mail Australia

04:17 13 Oct 2020, updated 04:17 13 Oct 2020

  • Keiara Moore is campaigning to break the stigma around deformities in society
  • Ms Moore’s daughter Mila was born with a cleft lip and has breathing difficulties 
  • The ‘Aussie Mum Vlogger’ ran a photoshoot with other women with deformities
  • She hopes to raise awareness of deformities and give inspiration to her daughter

A young mother has started a campaign to normalise the stigma around body deformities and differences after her daughter was born with a birth defect.

Keiara Moore uploaded a video to her ‘Aussie Mum Vlogger’ Youtube page on Monday to reveal her daughter Mila’s struggle with a cleft lip.

‘Mila was born with a unilateral cleft lip and she also has got a cleft of the gum notch, which basically means that from her nose to her kip on one side was completely

Read More

Australian government cites ‘chilling effect’ on cabinet in bid to block release of papers in Timor-Leste spy case



a man and a woman standing in front of a microphone: Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP

Government lawyers have invoked cabinet confidence in an attempt to stop Bernard Collaery and his team from viewing a briefing to the prime minister relevant to the Timor-Leste spying case.

Collaery, a barrister and former ACT attorney general, has been charged over his role in exposing details of a 2004 Australian intelligence operation to bug the Timor-Leste government during commercial negotiations to carve up oil and gas resources in the Timor Sea.



a group of people standing in front of a microphone: Bernard Collaery outside the ACT supreme court last year. Protesters gathered outside the court on Wednesday in support of Collaery and Witness K in the Timor-Leste spying case.


© Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP
Bernard Collaery outside the ACT supreme court last year. Protesters gathered outside the court on Wednesday in support of Collaery and Witness K in the Timor-Leste spying case.

It is alleged that Collaery, while representing intelligence whistleblower Witness K, illegally shared protected information about the operation.

Related: Australia’s attorney general Christian Porter accused of abusing powers in whistleblower trial

Collaery faces jail time if found guilty.

Read More

Google Sees Deal Within Reach on Australian Law to Pay for News

Tech Leaders Speak At Noah Technology Conference

Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg

For a fresh perspective on the stories that matter for Australian business and politics, sign up for our new weekly newsletter.

Google said it’s within reach of negotiating a compromise on legislation that would force it to pay for Australian news, as the U.S. giant continues a public campaign to get the proposed law watered down.

The Australian government has drafted a world-first code to make Google and Facebook Inc. compensate publishers for the value their stories generate for the platforms. The law is designed to support a local media industry, including Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., that has struggled to adapt to the digital economy.

Google argues the proposed law doesn’t reflect the value that the platforms themselves provide by redirecting readers to news websites. The U.S. company, owned by Alphabet Inc., said Tuesday that discussions with Australian authorities to get certain elements of

Read More

Australian government to pour AU$800m in digital business push

The Australian government has announced it will expand its digital identity system, touting that the move will allow more businesses to securely access government services online as part of its newly announced AU$800 million Digital Business Package.

The opt-in service allows users to verify their identity once before gaining access to over 70 government services, rather than having to continually be verified by each Commonwealth entity. It is currently being used by 1.6 million Australians and 1.16 million businesses.

“We need our businesses to be online, we need them to be digital businesses,” Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Tuesday.

“In recent months we have seen through COVID a rapid acceleration produced by necessity of businesses really engaging and upgrading their digital capability. What we’re announcing today, will build on that. It will strengthen it and it will accelerate it.”

The package also includes AU$28.5 million dedicated towards rolling out

Read More

Trump Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize by Australian Law Professors for Doctrine Against Endless Wars

On Monday President Donald Trump was nominated for the third time this year for a 2021 Noble Peace Prize. The nomination came courtesy of Australian law professors praising the “Trump Doctrine” against endless wars.



Donald Trump standing in front of a building: US President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, DC.


© Brendan Smialowski/Getty
US President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, DC.

While speaking with Sky News in Australia, law professor David Flint explained why he decided to nominate Trump.

“The Trump Doctrine is something extraordinary, as so many things that Donald Trump does. He is guided by two things, which seem to be absent from so many politicians. He has firstly common sense and he is only guided by a national interest, and therefore, in our circumstances, an interest in the Western alliance,” Flint said. “What he has done with the Trump Doctrine is that he has decided that he would no longer have America involved

Read More