Candidate says District 5 should have Hispanic commissioner

title=

In some of his campaign fliers, Renier Diaz de la Portilla urges voters in Miami-Dade Commission’s District 5 to vote for a Hispanic.

The landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965 made minority representation in government possible in the United States — and that includes Miami-Dade.

In the decades since, minorities have had to fight tooth and nail — not just to earn minority representation in government, but to keep it, and not see our presence diluted by efforts such as those shamefully advanced last week by Fabiola Santiago in what I think was a racist column.

Santiago’s attack is toward my belief, as a candidate for the largely Hispanic Miami-Dade Commission District 5, that it would be better represented by a Hispanic who has lived in the county all his life, and not the incumbent and my opponent Ohio-born Commissioner Eileen Higgins, who has not. The same principle applies to

Read More

Three former AGs say Trump is the candidate of chaos, not ‘law and order’

There is national conversation underway about policing and criminal justice reform. But for Minnesotans, this is personal.

As former Minnesota attorneys general, we understand that doing the job effectively means working with everyone in the community, from residents to community leaders to law enforcement officials. We know that the vast majority of people want a justice system that works for everyone and keeps our communities safe. And like most Minnesotans, we believe that during times of crisis such as this, steady and unifying leadership is required from the highest office in the land.

Instead of uniting our country and calming tensions, President Donald Trump and his allies have sought to further fan the flames of violence and racial tension, and they have politicized our state’s pain. The Trump campaign is running ads in our state that falsely characterize Trump as the “law and order” president, when the reality is that

Read More

Hariri Says He Isn’t Candidate to Form Lebanon Government

(Bloomberg) — Saad Hariri, Lebanon’s former premier close to Saudi Arabia, said he won’t be a candidate to form a new government, a day after Prime Minister-designate Mustafa Adib stepped down.



a man wearing a suit and tie: THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS - AUGUST 18: Former Prime Minister Saad Hariri gives a statement to the press outside the Lebanon Tribunal on August 18, 2020 in The Hague, Netherlands. The Special Tribunal for Lebanon delivered a guilty verdict against one of four men on trial for the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. Salim Ayyash was convicted on murder and terrorism charges, however the other three men were acquitted. All four were affiliated with the Shia militant group Hezbollah and had been on trial in absentia since 2014. (Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty Images)


© Photographer: Pierre Crom/Getty Images Europe
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS – AUGUST 18: Former Prime Minister Saad Hariri gives a statement to the press outside the Lebanon Tribunal on August 18, 2020 in The Hague, Netherlands. The Special Tribunal for Lebanon delivered a guilty verdict against one of four men on trial for the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. Salim Ayyash was convicted on murder and terrorism charges, however the other three men were acquitted. All four were affiliated with the Shia militant group Hezbollah and had been on trial in absentia since 2014. (Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty Images)

Hariri, head of the Sunni-dominated Future bloc, said he supports the initiative by French President Emmanuel Macron

Read More