U.K. Arts Groups Welcome Government’s COVID Cash Injection

Recipients of the government funding include major organizations such as the London Symphony Orchestra, which received 846,000 pounds, and tiny venues such as London’s 50-seat Finborough Theatre, which got just under 60,000 pounds. Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where The Beatles shot to fame, received a grant of 525,000 pounds.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said in a statement that the money was “a vital boost for the theaters, music venues, museums and cultural organizations that form the soul of our nation.”

Julian Bird, chief executive of umbrella body U.K. Theatre, said the news was “warmly welcomed, and will help create work and retain jobs.”

Britain’s museums, galleries, theaters and music venues all closed when the country went into lockdown in March. Some have managed to reopen, with reduced capacity and at a financial loss, but coronavirus restrictions make most live performances impossible.

Thousands of arts workers also have not been supported by

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U.K. Arts Groups Welcome Government’s COVID Cash Injection

The British government on Monday announced grants of 257 million pounds ($335 million) to help almost 1,400 arts and cultural organizations survive the coronavirus pandemic.

The money — the first chunk to be spent from a 1.57-billion-pound Culture Recovery Fund — was welcomed by arts organizations that have accused the government of neglecting them while supporting other businesses.

But just after the announcement, the government was forced to withdraw an advertisement that appeared to suggest ballet dancers should retrain for jobs in cybersecurity.

Recipients of the government funding include major organizations such as the London Symphony Orchestra, which received 846,000 pounds, and tiny venues such as London’s 50-seat Finborough Theatre, which got just under 60,000 pounds. Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where The Beatles shot to fame, received a grant of 525,000 pounds.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said in a statement that the money was “a vital boost for the theaters, music

Read More

COVID-hit UK arts groups welcome government cash infusion

LONDON (AP) — The British government on Monday announced grants of 257 million pounds ($335 million) to help almost 1,400 arts and cultural organizations survive the coronavirus pandemic.

The money — the first chunk to be spent from a 1.57-billion-pound Culture Recovery Fund — was welcomed by arts organizations that have accused the government of neglecting them while supporting other businesses.

But just after the announcement, the government was forced to withdraw an advertisement that appeared to suggest ballet dancers should retrain for jobs in cybersecurity.

Recipients of the government funding include major organizations such as the London Symphony Orchestra, which received 846,000 pounds, and tiny venues such as London’s 50-seat Finborough Theatre, which got just under 60,000 pounds. Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where The Beatles shot to fame, received a grant of 525,000 pounds.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said in a statement that the money was “a vital boost for

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Unions bet federal government ‘will bail out New York with massive amounts’ of cash

A third round of delayed pay increases for roughly 80,000 government workers has raised questions about how the state will close its estimated $14 billion budget gap absent further federal relief and without raising taxes.

Pay raises scheduled for April, July, and September will be delayed another 90 days, after which the state will reassess whether they can be implemented, Freeman Klopott of the Division of the Budget told the Times Union in a statement.

COVID-19-related lockdowns have added to steep losses in tax collections and state revenues.

“The governor’s action is the bare minimum,” Ken Girardin, a fellow and director of strategic initiatives at the Empire Center, told The Center Square by email. “The unions have generally bet that the federal government will bail out New York with massive amounts of unrestricted cash.”

The state has not renewed service contracts and instituted a hiring freeze. But it has not

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Cash no longer king in Italy as COVID helps government push for plastic

By Elisa Anzolin and Gavin Jones

ROME/MILAN (Reuters) – Italy’s love affair with cash is fading. The coronavirus is turning Italians off notes and coins and the government is launching a raft of incentives to accelerate the trend, believing plastic payment can curb rampant tax evasion.

The Treasury estimates some 109 billion euros of tax is evaded annually, equal to about 21% of the revenue actually collected. The government believes the problem can be tackled by boosting digital payments which, unlike cash, leave a trace.

Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte is offering refunds on some money spent electronically, tax breaks for outlets with card machines and a new 50-million euro ($58.93 million) state lottery for card users only.

The coronavirus, which forced the government to lock down the economy between March and May, is helping his efforts.

“We have seen a surge in digital payments since the lockdown, I think mainly

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U.K. Seizes Millions in Cash, Knightsbridge Properties in First Use of Dirty Money Law

(Bloomberg) — The U.K. reached a 9.8 million pound ($12.7 million) settlement in its first successful use of a controversial power designed to crack down on dirty money.



a sign on the side of a building: LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 07: A general view of The National Crime Agency building in Westminster on October 7, 2013 in London, England. The NCA replaces SOCA, the Serious Organised Crime Agency, which was formed in 2006. Dubbed "the British FBI", the NCA will be tasked with tackling the most serious of crimes in the UK and replaces a number of existing bodies. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)


© Photographer: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images Europe
LONDON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 07: A general view of The National Crime Agency building in Westminster on October 7, 2013 in London, England. The NCA replaces SOCA, the Serious Organised Crime Agency, which was formed in 2006. Dubbed “the British FBI”, the NCA will be tasked with tackling the most serious of crimes in the UK and replaces a number of existing bodies. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The National Crime Agency settled a so-called Unexplained Wealth Order with Mansoor “Manni” Mahmood Hussain, a Leeds businessman, the agency said Wednesday in a statement. The 40-year-old handed over more than 45 properties in London, Leeds and Cheshire, four parcels of land, and nearly 600,000 pounds in cash.

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Want to solve society’s most urgent problems? Cash prizes can spur breakthroughs

Innovation is a critical part of tackling problems in areas as diverse as transportation, housing, public health and energy. But the scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs who might generate creative solutions often investigate issues or pursue economic opportunities in other less urgent fields. Incentives for science and innovation try to steer efforts toward the most pressing societal problems.

Prizes – cash rewards for scientific, engineering and other achievements – are one form of incentive that has been around for a very long time. In the 18th century, for example, organizations such as the Royal Society in the U.K. awarded medals to scientists for their breakthrough research.

Today, in addition to this type of scientific award, there are also prizes for solutions to diverse problems including the invention of new transportation means for disabled people, the engineering of new battery recycling methods, and even the development of technologies to treat COVID-19 patients.

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EXCLUSIVE-EU chair Germany proposes rule of law scheme for getting bloc’s cash – document

BRUSSELS, Sept 28 (Reuters) – European Union chair Germany has proposed a rule of law conditionality scheme for accessing the bloc’s funds, including the new 750 billion euro coronavirus economic recovery fund, according to a document seen by Reuters.

The proposal is a basis for negotiations between the 27 EU member states – which in July agreed to such a mechanism but left it watered down to avoid a veto from Poland or Hungary – and the European Parliament.

EU lawmakers want to beef up the mechanism, meaning that the German proposal – sticking closely to the July agreement reached at a leaders’ summit after four days of tortuous talks – is all but certain to cause an outcry.

According to the German document, punishments for rule of law breaches would include suspending EU funding and be decided by a majority vote of EU member states acting on a recommendation

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EU chair Germany proposes rule of law scheme for getting bloc’s cash

By Gabriela Baczynska

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Germany, current president of the European Union, has proposed a scheme that links access to European Union money, including the 750 billion euro recovery fund, to respecting the rule of law, a document seen by Reuters showed on Monday.

The proposal will underpin negotiations between the European Parliament and the 27 EU governments, which in July agreed to such a mechanism in principle but left out much detail to avoid a veto from Poland or Hungary, whose nationalist governments stand accused of flouting EU democratic norms.

Warsaw and Budapest are under EU investigations for undermining the independence of the judiciary, media and non-governmental organisations, and both could lose tens of billions of euros in funding if the rule of law mechanism is established.

In the recovery fund alone, excluding the linked long-term EU budget for 2021-27, Poland would be at risk of losing access

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Exclusive: EU Chair Germany Proposes Rule of Law Scheme for Getting Bloc’s Cash – Document | World News

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union chair Germany has proposed a rule of law conditionality scheme for accessing the bloc’s funds, including the new 750 billion euro coronavirus economic recovery fund, according to a document seen by Reuters.

The proposal is a basis for negotiations between the 27 EU member states – which in July agreed to such a mechanism but left it watered down to avoid a veto from Poland or Hungary – and the European Parliament.

EU lawmakers want to beef up the mechanism, meaning that the German proposal – sticking closely to the July agreement reached at a leaders’ summit after four days of tortuous talks – is all but certain to cause an outcry.

According to the German document, punishments for rule of law breaches would include suspending EU funding and be decided by a majority vote of EU member states acting on a recommendation by the

Read More