Tesla Beefing Up Its Public, Government Relations Teams in China

(Bloomberg) — Tesla Inc. is hiring public and government relations staff in China as the world’s biggest car market becomes a more important source of income for the top electric-vehicle maker.

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The Palo Alto, California-based company is seeking new hires in China’s large cities, as well as smaller hubs including Shijiazhuang in Hebei province near Beijing and Haikou, a port city that’s the capital of the island province of Hainan, according to a job advertisement that was confirmed by a company representative. The online ad didn’t specify how many people Tesla is looking for but the recruitment posting covers 10 cities.

The hirings are in contrast to Tesla’s media approach in the U.S., where its communications team has largely been disbanded. The company, run by billionaire Elon Musk, hasn’t responded to inquiries from Bloomberg and other media outlets for nearly a year, and many of the people who

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China is snapping up Japanese government bonds, and it’s not just for the returns

  • China bought 1.46 trillion yen ($13.8 billion) in medium to long-term Japanese government bonds on a net basis between April and July. That was 3.6 times more than the same period last year.
  • In the same period, the U.S. increased its purchases by only 30%, in comparison. Europe, meanwhile, sold off 3 trillion yen worth of JGBs.
  • Yields on such bonds are near zero, making them an unlikely option as an investment. But analysts told CNBC there are other reasons why China would want to buy those bonds.



text, calendar: Bank notes of the Chinese yuan, Japanese yen and the U.S. dollar.


© Provided by CNBC
Bank notes of the Chinese yuan, Japanese yen and the U.S. dollar.

SINGAPORE — China’s recent purchase of Japanese government bonds surged to the highest level in more than three years – as the country more than tripled its holdings between April and July this year, compared to the previous year.

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During those three months in

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China hands out $1.5m of digital currency in cashless society trial

  • Authorities in Shenzhen, southern China, have handed out $1.5 million of a new digital currency as part of a trial of a cashless society.
  • Last Friday authorities gave 50,000 lottery winners the equivalent of $30 each to spend digitally by October 16, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.
  • The digital currency is not like a cryptocurrency, and is issued and controlled by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.
  • The PBoC said it plans to formally launch the digital payment system in late 2020, according to the BBC.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Chinese city has handed out 10 million yuan, or $1.5 million, in digital currency to trial what citizens would do in a cashless society.

On Friday, 50,000 people living in the Luhou district of Shenzhen were given digital “red envelopes,” each containing around 200 yuan ($30) worth of the digital currency, the state-run

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Disney executive defends Mulan filming in China despite government’s human rights abuses

Disney’s president of film production, Sean Bailey, addressed the recent controversy over the studio’s live-action Mulan remake in a letter to a British politician this week. In the letter, which member of parliament Iain Duncan Smith posted online Thursday, Bailey defended the choice to film portions of Mulan in an area of China that has been the site of extensive human rights abuses.



a group of people walking down a dirt road: Jasin Boland/Disney


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Jasin Boland/Disney

After Mulan debuted on Disney+ last month, controversy arose when viewers noticed the end credits included “special thanks” to several government entities in Xinjiang, a region in northwest China. The region has been the site of what experts have called a “cultural genocide,” with the Chinese government detaining and torturing Uighur Muslims in mass “re-education” camps.

Some of the entities thanked in Mulan‘s credits have been directly linked to this campaign, including the Turpan Bureau of Public Security,

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Pence Accuses Biden of Being a ‘Cheerleader for Communist China’ Throughout His Career in Government

Vice President Mike Pence accused Joe Biden of being a “cheerleader” for China during the vice presidential debate on Wednesday night.

Pence faced off against opponent Senator Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) in the only election debate between the vice presidential candidates. Harris criticized President Trump’s handling of the tariff war with China, in which the Trump administration and Chinese government have placed tariffs on various exports.

“The vice president earlier referred to…what he thinks is an accomplishment: the president’s trade war with China,” Harris said. “You lost that trade war.” Harris went on to blame the trade war for the loss of 300,000 American manufacturing jobs.

Pence, however, hit back at the senator’s criticism.

“Lost the trade war with China? Joe Biden never fought it,” Pence said. “Joe Biden’s been a cheerleader for communist China through…the last several decades.”

Pence went on to assert that while Biden was vice president

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China needs a raft of reforms to make new economic strategy work: government advisers

BEIJING (Reuters) – China will need a plethora of reforms if it is to make a new economic strategy that relies mainly on domestic consumption work, advisers to the Chinese cabinet said on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO: People wearing face masks walk on a street in Shanghai, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, China July 16, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

President Xi Jinping has proposed a “dual circulation” strategy for the next phase of economic development in which China will rely predominantly on “domestic circulation”, to be supported by “international circulation”.

“To rely mainly on domestic circulation, we indeed face a very arduous task,” Yao Jingyuan, the former chief economist for the country’s National Bureau of Statistics, told a briefing.

“Fundamentally we must rely on reforms, and we need to deepen reforms.”

Lin Yifu, a second adviser to the cabinet, said China’s new economic strategy was not a short-term measure to

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Oxford tells China scholars to submit anonymously, fearing natsec law

  • The University of Oxford has told students of Chinese politics to submit work anonymously to avoid falling foul of China’s national security law, The Guardian reported Monday.
  • The law, imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, gave China the power to define and punish “separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference.”
  • But China says it applies to everyone, even those not in China or Hong Kong.
  • An associate professor of Chinese politics at Oxford, told The Guardian that students would be “submitting and presenting work anonymously in order to afford some extra protection.”
  • Princeton and Harvard Business School have also taken steps to safeguard students studying Chinese politics.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

The University of Oxford has asked students of Chinese politics to submit their work for grading anonymously so that they don’t fall foul of Hong Kong’s new national security law, The Guardian reported Monday.

The law,

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Oxford is asking students specializing in China to submit papers anonymously so they don’t fall foul of Hong Kong’s draconian national security law



a person standing in front of a church: The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images


© Oil Scarff/Getty Images
The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images

  • The University of Oxford has told students of Chinese politics to submit work anonymously to avoid falling foul of China’s national security law, The Guardian reported Monday.
  • The law, imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, gave China the power to define and punish “separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference.”
  • But China says it applies to everyone, even those not in China or Hong Kong.
  • An associate professor of Chinese politics at Oxford, told The Guardian that students would be “submitting and presenting work anonymously in order to afford some extra protection.”
  • Princeton and Harvard Business School have also taken steps to safeguard students studying Chinese politics.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

The University of Oxford has asked students of Chinese politics to submit their work for grading anonymously so that they don’t

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