Former IBM CEO Ginni Rometty on companies fighting racial injustice

IBM Executive Chairman Ginni Rometty told CNBC on Thursday that corporate America has the potential to create long-lasting societal change by advancing the cause of racial equality.

“The private sector has the ability to create a movement, and actually, I think, this could be the greatest mobilization of the private sector for a benefit of society,” Rometty said on “Squawk on the Street.” 

Rometty, who stepped down as IBM chief executive earlier this year, has been a staunch advocate for companies to rethink hiring practices to include candidates with diverse backgrounds, including people who haven’t obtained four-year college degrees.

Rometty’s comments Thursday come as the United States experiences renewed calls for racial justice following high-profile killings by White police offices of Black Americans in 2020, including George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

Activists, customers and even employees have applied pressure and demanded action from companies. With protests at their peak

Read More

The Energy 202: Trump administration dinged by government watchdog for pandemic relief for oil companies

That royalty relief was supposed to go to wells that would have otherwise shut down because of the sharp decline in oil prices. The idea was to make sure that normally profitable wells were not plugged permanently because of the health crisis. 

But the GAO, in a report released Tuesday, said the Trump administration failed to properly take the economic viability of wells into account when deciding which wells got relief — and probably ended up offering aid to oil producers that did not need it, shortchanging taxpayers in the process.

“This is exactly the time the government should be spending money,” said Frank Rusco, the watchdog agency’s director of natural resources and environment. “But we’re about good government. And if you do it, do it in a smart way.”

When oil prices plummeted this spring, the Trump administration offered a 60-day reprieve on royalty payments in more than 500

Read More

We Need More Entrepreneurs Building Companies That Address Society’s Biggest Needs

2020 is the year the world’s attention turned to the deep fractures of our economic, political, educational, and healthcare systems. The year when status quo solutions were no longer good enough. For all the declarations of being “in this together,” the dual pandemics of Covid-19 and systemic racism have revealed how low-income communities and people of color are disproportionately left out, let down, and punished by our systems.

The death of George Floyd, representing too many Black lives lost, has reignited the movement for racial justice around the world, demonstrating that we urgently need to build a society that is not only inclusive, but also just. The immediate call to reform police and criminal-justice systems in America is a significant step, but the change must go further. We must upend how capital flows, how hospitals care for patients, how institutions lend, how employers hire and care for workers, and how

Read More

“Drive-by” ADA lawsuits filed against Colorado companies

James Blanchard had just reopened his Denver winery this summer after being shut down for months because of COVID-19 when he got hit with a different kind of challenge — a surprise lawsuit alleging the website for his family business violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The lawsuit said David Katt, a resident of Douglas County who is blind, couldn’t use the downtown winery’s website because it was not compatible with screen-reading programs that allow people who are visually impaired to navigate online.

“We were caught out of the blue by this lawsuit,” Blanchard said. “There was no advanced warning, no contact, no communication from the plaintiff or their attorneys, it was just served on the front door of my apartment.”

Now he’s facing a potentially expensive legal fight at a time when sales at his 2-year-old Denver winery are down 30% because of the coronavirus — and he’s not

Read More

34 companies to release data

CLOSE

Companies across the country have been speaking out against racism, but less than 2% of top executives at 50 largest companies are Black.

USA TODAY

Nearly three dozen major U.S. companies including Amazon, General Motors, Target and Wells Fargo have agreed to share the diversity reports they file each year with the federal government.

The disclosures from 34 Standard & Poor’s 100 companies are the result of a campaign by New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer following the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who died under the knee of a white policeman in Minneapolis.

“By publicly disclosing the demographics of employees by race, gender, and ethnicity – including leadership roles and senior management – these companies will provide crucial information for shareowners to better understand diversity and workforce practices – and identify areas for growth,” Stringer, who advises the city’s public retirement funds, said in a statement.

Read More

34 companies to release government workforce diversity data

Nearly three dozen major U.S. companies including Amazon, General Motors, Target and Wells Fargo have agreed to share the diversity reports they file each year with the federal government.

Less than 2% of top executives at the 50 largest companies are Black

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The disclosures from 34 Standard & Poor’s 100 companies are the result of a campaign by New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer following the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who died under the knee of a white policeman in Minneapolis.

“By publicly disclosing the demographics of employees by race, gender, and ethnicity – including leadership roles and senior management – these companies will provide crucial information for shareowners to better understand diversity and workforce practices – and identify areas for growth,” Stringer, who advises the city’s public retirement funds, said in a statement.



a group of people wearing costumes: George Floyd's family raise their hands as attorney Ben Crump (out of frame) speaks at a press conference outside the family justice center after a court hearing on the murder of George Floyd on Sept. 11, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Four police officers accused of murdering George Floyd, the 46-year-old African-American man whose death in May sparked nationwide protests, appeared together in Minneapolis court for the first time that day.


© KEREM YUCEL, AFP via Getty Images
George

Read More

The Significance Of Ambulance Companies In Society

Social constructionism is a mechanism, or technique, that shapes one’s perception of society and actuality. Influential feminist teachers have written books making legal arguments for the legally sanctioned murder of males and have attempted to provide arguments to excuse grownup female guards committing statutory rape towards juvenile male inmates in detention facilities (to examine additional, see my links to both examples in my article on Why So Many Folks Are Towards Feminism underneath the part Not All Feminists Are Like That).

Thailand is a land thaitified by the white thai race minority, under no circumstances the land of individuals of white thai blood. Douglass’ reveals how the slaves had been dehumanized when he says, there were horses and men, cattle and women, pigs and children, all holding the identical rank in the scale of being, and had been all subjected to the same slender examination”.

It’s hardly shocking that social … Read More

The Importance Of Ambulance Companies In Society

Social stratification in American Society is not clearly outlined or decided; nonetheless social scientist has developed a socio -economic stratification of the American society. In western international locations, there have been circumstances of bribery and other forms of corruption in all potential fields: underneath-the-desk funds made to reputed surgeons by patients willing to be on prime of the record of forthcoming surgeries, bribes paid by suppliers to the automotive business in order to sell poor quality connectors used as an example in safety tools such as airbags, bribes paid by suppliers to manufacturers of defibrillators (to sell poor quality capacitors), contributions paid by wealthy dad and mom to the “social and culture fund” of a prestigious college in trade for it to accept their youngsters, bribes paid to obtain diplomas, monetary and other benefits granted to unionists by members of the manager board of a car producer in exchange for … Read More