More Americans blame the U.S. government than foreign nations for the country’s coronavirus crisis

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans blame the U.S. government instead of foreign nations for the coronavirus crisis in the United States, a rebuke to the Trump administration’s contention that China or other countries are most at fault, a new poll shows.

The poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was conducted before President Donald Trump tested positive for the virus Friday and was hospitalized. Trump has downplayed the severity and impact of the pandemic in recent months.

Although many see plenty of blame to go around and there’s a wide bipartisan divide over who is responsible, 56% of Americans say the U.S. government has substantial responsibility for the situation. That compares with 47% who place that much blame on the governments of other countries and only 39% who say the same about the World Health Organization.

“It

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Poll: More blame US government than foreign nations for coronavirus crisis

More than half of Americans blame the federal government for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a higher number than those who said they primarily blamed foreign governments such as China for the disease’s spread.

A poll conducted for the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 56 percent of respondents say the U.S. government carries “substantial” responsibility for the state of American COVID-19 outbreak, while just 47 percent said the same about leaders of foreign countries and 39 percent blamed the World Health Organization (WHO).

That comes after months of the Trump administration blaming both China’s government and the WHO for the scale of the U.S. outbreak, which has surpassed 7 million cases and more than 209,000 deaths. Top administration officials have claimed for months that the U.S. response was hampered by China’s supposed unwillingness to

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Coronavirus live news: Irish government ‘to reject new lockdown recommendation’; Paris bars to close | World news

An initiative from Germany’s Social Democrat labour minister to give people the right to work from home is facing opposition from chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives and business groups, though a survey shows most workers like the idea.

The coronavirus pandemic has interrupted work flows in many companies in Europe’s largest economy, accelerating a trend to work partly from home and speeding up the digitisation of business organisation and communication.

But it has also created new problems such as working longer hours and pushing up stress levels, especially among parents juggling childcare and working from home.

Hubertus Heil from the co-governing, centre-left SPD told Deutschlandfunk radio on Monday that his draft law would give employees the right to work from home or somewhere else at least 24 days per year if the profession and work flows allow.

With the draft law, Heil wants to increase job satisfaction among employees and avoid

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Warren, Durbin letter to Barr slams BOP’s coronavirus containment efforts

Federal prisoners, corrections staff, government inspectors and civil rights advocates have complained for months that the BOP’s strategies, when useful, are inconsistently applied. The overall inadequate response is leaving a vulnerable population at risk of infection and creating major vectors for transmission more than seven months into the pandemic. Since the start of the outbreak, more than 17,000 federal prisoners and staffers have tested positive and more than 130 have died.

“This is mounting evidence that efforts to contain the virus within BOP facilities are failing,” Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) wrote to Barr and Carvajal in one of the Oct. 2 letters, which were viewed by The Washington Post.

The letters capture Democratic lawmakers’ mounting frustrations with Barr and Carvajal, who, since March, have reportedly ignored lawmakers’ concerns, like the ones raised in the October letter.

Though incarceration rates have slowed in recent years,

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Coronavirus live news: global cases pass 35m as Walter Reed physician calls Trump drive ‘insanity’ | World news

US president Donald Trump has begun a fourth day at the military hospital where he is being treated for Covid-19, as his condition remained unclear and outside experts warned his case may be severe.

The president’s team is treating 74-year-old Trump with a steroid, dexmethasone, normally used only in the most severe cases.

His medical team told reporters on Sunday that Trump could return to the White House as early as Monday. Even if he does, he will need to continue treatment as the Republican president is still undergoing a five-day course of an intravenous antiviral drug, remdesivir.

The normal quarantine period for anyone testing positive for the coronavirus is 14 days.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on Monday reiterated the hope that Trump would be released shortly from the hospital.

“He will meet with his doctors and nurses this morning to make further assessments of his

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Coronavirus latest: UK cases surge as government says technical fault affects testing data

Jasmine Cameron-Chileshe in London

The number of positive coronavirus cases within the UK surged again on Sunday, with the government admitting that “technical” issues had caused delays in the publication of test results.

A record 22,961 new coronavirus cases were confirmed on Sunday, an increase of more than 10,000 compared with 12,872 on Saturday.

The government said a technical issue had been identified overnight on Friday “in the automated process that transfers positive cases data” to Public Health England.

As a result, the number of coronavirus cases announced on Saturday and Sunday included 15,841 additional cases from between September 25 and Friday. Last night, the government said that the issue, though resolved, would affect case numbers in the next few days.

A message on the coronavirus data dashboard on Saturday warned that data published in the next few days would “include some additional cases” from between September 24 and October

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Coronavirus USA: The move to a cashless society because of COVID-19 pandemic

Among many changes the COVID-19 pandemic has brought to the U.S., one is a possible move closer to a cashless society.

Since more people decided to stay home when the coronavirus outbreak spread, they were spending less money. If people were out, fear of catching the virus kept them from touching many things, including loose change at the register.

As Americans made more non-cash purchases, headlines of a coin shortage followed.

READ MORE: Millennial Money: Try touchless payment to avoid dirty money

“The coins aren’t getting to where they need to be,” said Harvard business professor Shelle Santana.

In 2018, non-cash transactions, including debit cards, credit cards, electronic payments and checks, totaled more than 174 billion. In 2015, that number was 30.5 billion less.

“It’s just faster,” Santana said. “It’s faster for the consumer and faster for the seller. So if your cashier isn’t having to count coins in particular,

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Top health official says coronavirus ‘herd immunity is not the strategy of the U.S. government’

  • Allowing the coronavirus to circulate through the U.S. population unchecked in an effort to achieve herd immunity “is not the strategy” of the nation’s federal government, HHS Secretary Alex Azar said. 
  • The nation’s top health officials have warned that letting the coronavirus spread uncontrollably in an effort to achieve herd immunity would result in an “enormous” death toll. 
  • White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Scott Atlas, however, has previously pushed the idea of herd immunity. 



a man wearing a suit and tie looking at the camera: Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar speaks during a House Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 26, 2020.


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Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar speaks during a House Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 26, 2020.

Allowing the coronavirus to circulate through the U.S. population unchecked in an effort to achieve herd immunity is not the government’s plan, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said, despite reports that White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Scott Atlas has pushed the idea. 

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“Herd immunity is not the strategy

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Top health official says coronavirus herd immunity not U.S. strategy

Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar speaks during a House Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 26, 2020.

Amanda Voisard | Reuters

Allowing the coronavirus to circulate through the U.S. population unchecked in an effort to achieve herd immunity “is not the strategy” of the nation’s government despite reports that White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Scott Atlas has pushed the idea, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said. 

“Herd immunity is not the strategy of the U.S. government with regard to coronavirus,” Azar in response to a question from Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., on Friday during a U.S. House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing. 

“We may get herd slowing of transmission as we perhaps have seen in the New York area and other concentrated areas. Our mission is to reduce fatalities, protect the vulnerable, keep coronavirus cases down to the lowest level possible,” Azar added. 

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Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis and the 25th Amendment

The key provision is the 25th Amendment. The original Constitution provided that the vice president steps in when the president is incapacitated, but it said nothing about how the president’s incapacity was supposed to be determined. As a result, we have had long stretches (when President James Garfield was shot; when President Woodrow Wilson had a stroke) where the vice president should have been in charge but instead the president’s staff or spouse ruled. Enacted in the 1960s after John F. Kennedy was assassinated and at the height of the Cold War, the 25th Amendment finally provided a clear process, with the aim of ensuring that there is always a hand at the helm.

Section 3 of the amendment allows the president to transfer power voluntarily to the vice president. To do this, Trump would send formal notice to the speaker of the House and president pro tempore of the

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