Tech giants have skirted regulation because of how monopolies are defined by law. Democrats now want to rewrite those laws.



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Jeff Bezos standing in front of a television: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images


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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images

  • Now that House Democrats have completed a sweeping antitrust investigation into Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google, they’re prepared to introduce new laws to curb the tech giants’ power.
  • The 449-page report published by the House Antitrust Subcommittee on Tuesday, as well as public statements by Democrats on the heels of the report, signal how they might go about changing the laws.
  • Antitrust court decisions in recent decades have focused on consumer welfare, but Democrats say laws need to be updated given that many tech companies don’t charge consumers for their products and have wide-ranging impacts on workers and other businesses.
  • Meanwhile, Republicans
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Akwaeke Emezi shuns Women’s prize over request for details of sex as defined ‘by law’ | Books

Akwaeke Emezi, who became the first non-binary transgender author to be nominated for the Women’s prize in 2019, has said that they will not let their future novels be entered for the award after the prize asked them for information on their sex as defined “by law”.

When Emezi made the running for the Women’s prize last year for their debut novel, Freshwater, judges said they were not aware of Emezi’s gender when reading submissions and described their longlisting as a “historic moment”.

But on Monday, Emezi said their publisher, Faber, had asked them if they wanted their second novel, The Death of Vivek Oji, to be submitted for the prize this year. Following the life and untimely death of a protagonist who tells his friends that they can “refer to him as either she or he, that he was both”, The Death of Vivek Oji was praised in the

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