18,000 elderly people have died of COVID-19 in British care homes and now Boris Johnson’s government is being accused of human rights abuse



a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor's hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty


© Getty
Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor’s hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty

  • The death of thousands of COVID-19 in British care homes was a violation of their human rights, according to Amnesty International.
  • The human rights organization has now called for the public inquiry, promised by the government in July, to begin immediately. 
  • The report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued on a blanket basis in care homes.
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More than 18,000 untested elderly people died of COVID-19 in British care homes in what a damning new report from Amnesty International has described as a violation of their human rights.

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Between March and June, over 28,116 “excess deaths” were recorded in care homes in England, with 18,500 of them confirmed to have

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Coronavirus vaccine ‘should be given to elderly first’, government advisor says

A group of people wearing face masks wait for a bus in Southend on Sea, Essex. (Getty)
A group of people wearing face masks wait for a bus in Southend on Sea, Essex. (Getty)

A coronavirus vaccine is likely to be given to elderly people first when it arrives, a government advisor has said.

Professor Adam Finn, from the University of Bristol, who is a member of the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation (JCVI), said age should determine those given priority rather than occupation.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that evidence collected by the JCVI, which advises the government on vaccines, showed carers and those who are vulnerable should also receive the jab ahead of the rest of the population.

“People should not imagine that there’s going to be a sudden and complete solution,” he said on Tuesday.

“These early vaccines I hope will work to some extent, but there are lots of different vaccines, and they will not all work equally effectively.

An elderly woman wearing a face mask shelters from the rain in London. (Getty)
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