Harry Reid Claims U.S. Government Covered Up UFO Evidence for Years

Former Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) says the U.S. government has worked for years to cover up evidence of possible close encounters with UFOs. 

Reid, who pushed for the creation of a classified, now-defunct U.S. government UFO program, said in The Phenomenon, a new documentary by director James Fox, that “there’s more than one up there.”

Most of the evidence the government has around UFOs “hasn’t seen the light of day,” he said.

“We have it — it’s there,” the 80-year-old said. 

He said the government “did everything they could” to stop the UFO program and “wanted nothing to do with this.”

“Nobody has to agree why it’s there. But shouldn’t we at least be spending some money to study all these phenomenon? Shouldn’t we study this stuff? The answer is yes. That’s all this was about,” he said.

“And why the federal government all these years

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law firm gathering evidence for two class-action lawsuits

HALIFAX — A law firm representing the families of victims of the April mass shooting in Nova Scotia has hired a criminal investigation firm as it prepares two potential class-action lawsuits.





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Halifax-based Patterson Law issued a statement Wednesday saying Martin and Associates Investigations will provide expertise about police procedures, crime scene analysis and related matters that may turn up evidence supporting the lawsuits.

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One of the proposed class-action proceedings names the estate of the lone gunman who killed 22 people on April 18-19 during a 13-hour rampage that spanned several communities in northern and central Nova Scotia.

The second class-action, which names the RCMP and the Nova Scotia government, focuses on the police response to the killings.

“We are actively seeking the assistance of the public to provide information that may be relevant to the gunman’s actions and the law enforcement response

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Ashley Banjo Says Diversity Ofcom Complaints Are Evidence Of A Deeper Issue In British Society



Ashley Banjo for GQ Hype


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Ashley Banjo for GQ Hype

Diversity troupe leader Ashley Banjo has said the controversy surrounding the group’s recent performance on Britain’s Got Talent, which reflected on the events of 2020, is indicative of a deeper issue in British society.

In the first semi-final show of this year’s BGT, Diversity returned to the stage to put on a powerful performance looking back at key moments in the year, including scenes alluding to the coronavirus pandemic, the killing of George Floyd and the ensuing global protests against police brutality.

While the routine won widespread praise at the time, it also led to more than 24,000 complaints being made to Ofcom, which the media regulator eventually dismissed.

Reflecting on the performance in a new interview with GQ Hype, Ashley admitted he was surprised at how much the Black Lives Matter-inspired section of the routine ended up being focussed on.



Ashley Banjo looking at the camera: Ashley Banjo for GQ Hype


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