Explainer: How Trump’s Supreme Court nominee applies the law to LGBT+ rights

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court has alarmed many LGBT+ advocates, who fear the appointment of another conservative judge would jeopardise the rights of gay and trans people.

FILE PHOTO: Rainbow flags fly at Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan in support of the LGBT community, prior to the 51st anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, in New York City, New York, U.S., June 26, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

If confirmed, Barrett, who has described conservative judge Antonin Scalia as her mentor, would push the country’s highest court to a 6-3 conservative majority.

At 48, she could serve for decades in the lifetime job, potentially leaving a lasting conservative legacy.

“Confirming Barrett will drag America backwards,” Sarah Kate Ellis, head of the LGBT+ advocacy group GLAAD, said in a statement when she was nominated.

As the U.S. Senate on Monday

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Explainer: Indonesia’s jobs law endangers environment, say activists, investors

JAKARTA/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Environmentalists in Indonesia are calling for the reversal of a controversial law aimed at job creation because it is seen favouring business interests at the expense of the environment and labour.

A demonstrator holds an Indonesian flag during a protest against the government’s labour reforms in a controversial jobs creation law in Jakarta, Indonesia, October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Indonesia, the world’s biggest producer of palm oil and nickel ore for electric vehicle batteries, has forests bigger than any outside the Amazon and Congo, and environmentalists say the country’s abundant natural reserves could be exploited under the new law.

The reforms are contained in a so-called “omnibus” bill of changes in more than 70 laws, which allowed parliament to vote in a single swoop and pass the measure on Monday.

Thousands of people took to the streets of cities across Indonesia over the past three days, part

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Explainer: Indonesia’s Jobs Law Endangers Environment, Say Activists, Investors | World News

By Fathin Ungku, Gayatri Suroyo and Bernadette Christina

JAKARTA/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Environmentalists in Indonesia are calling for the reversal of a controversial law aimed at job creation because it is seen favouring business interests at the expense of the environment and labour.

Indonesia, the world’s biggest producer of palm oil and nickel ore for electric vehicle batteries, has forests bigger than any outside the Amazon and Congo, and environmentalists say the country’s abundant natural reserves could be exploited under the new law.

The reforms are contained in a so-called “omnibus” bill of changes in more than 70 laws, which allowed parliament to vote in a single swoop and pass the measure on Monday.

Thousands of people took to the streets of cities across Indonesia over the past three days, part of protests and national strikes against the law.

The government says the law is needed to improve the investment climate

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Explainer: The $4 trillion U.S. government relies on individual taxpayers

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government’s over $4 trillion annual budget, the world’s largest, relies heavily on individual wage earners whose taxes and retirement benefits are deducted from every paycheck, leaning particularly on the top 20% of income earners.

FILE PHOTO: The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) building is seen in Washington, U.S. September 28, 2020. REUTERS/Erin Scott/

Corporations pay just a fraction of what individuals do into the federal spending pool, which funds the military, transportation safety, veterans benefits, regulatory agencies and programs like NASA.

A New York Times investigation here published on Sunday shows that President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal taxes during the years straddling his 2017 inauguration, and none at all for 10 of 15 years before then. Trump dismissed the report as “fake news.”

Trump reported here income of at least $594 million for 2016 and early 2017 and assets worth at least $1.4

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