Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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CBI boss urges firms and UK government to come together for trade

CBI director general Carolyn Fairbairn will say that trade offers one of the most powerful routes to post-coronavirus economic recovery. Photo: Carl Court/Getty
CBI director general Carolyn Fairbairn will say that trade offers one of the most powerful routes to post-coronavirus economic recovery. Photo: Carl Court/Getty

Trading success depends on a “hardwire collaboration” between UK companies and the government to help create new jobs, according to the Confederation of British Industry (CBI).

Speaking at the business group’s International Trade Conference, director general, Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, will stress that business must be round the table to make trade work for local communities.

She will say that trade offers one of the most “powerful routes” to post-coronavirus economic recovery.

“Now is the time for the UK to champion free, fair and open trade, particularly in industries of the future, from services and low-carbon innovation to tech and life sciences.

“Having business closely involved is the proven way to give UK negotiators the real-time intelligence and edge they need to secure the best deals.”

On the

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UK government prepares jobs support if firms forced to close

LONDON (AP) — The British government is on Friday set to announce further support for firms to retain staff in the coming months if they are forced to close as a result of the imposition of further lockdown restrictions.

With the government expected to tighten restrictions over the coming days to deal with a sharp spike in new coronavirus infections, there are growing concerns that the economy will suffer during the winter and that hundreds of thousands of jobs may be lost.

Treasury chief Rishi Sunak said he understood how “people are worried about the coming winter months.”


He is being urged by businesses, politicians and unions to accompany any lockdown restrictions with a financial support package to prevent mass unemployment. Specifically, he is being urged to back local job retention programs, whereby the government steps in to pay the lion’s share of the salaries of workers who are forced

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Firms face ‘cliff edge’ with lay-offs after Christmas

Commuters as business leaders sound the alarm over jobs. Photo: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images
Commuters as business leaders sound the alarm over jobs. Photo: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

Business groups have warned UK employers face a “cliff edge” as government support is cut back this winter, risking a fresh wave of job losses after Christmas.

Three leading business figures sounded the alarm over chancellor Rishi Sunak’s new job support scheme on Tuesday, with fears employers will still not be able to prevent lay-offs.

Sunak has resisted pressure to extend the job protection scheme, which saw millions of staff furloughed across the economy when the coronavirus and lockdown first hit. Last month he instead announced a new wage subsidy scheme from November, on top of a ‘job retention bonus’ for firms keeping furloughed staff.

Employers’ contributions are significantly higher under the new initiative, with organisations expected to pay more than half workers’ typical wages for only a third of their hours.

Watch: What are

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Big Law Firms Prosper Despite Covid-Impaired Economy

Lawyers at large law firms aren’t worried, as many Americans are, about job security while the coronavirus pandemic continues to upend everyday life. Some of them are even collecting extra bonuses.

Many large law firms have excelled financially this year, even as some clients in sectors ranging from hospitality to retail have suffered. The most elite firms say they are on track for a record year, thanks to hot practice areas like restructuring and public-offerings work, and many are doling out extra money to lawyers this fall.

Firm leaders and consultants attribute the stability to lawyers’ ability to easily work from home, business that comes from a range of industries and practice areas, and a major reduction in travel expenses.

“It’s like building bridges in wartime—you prefer a different environment,” said Robert Hays, the Atlanta-based chairman of King & Spalding LLP. “But we’ve built the bridge. So in terms of

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Insider Cannabis: Law firms are eyeing psychedelics

Welcome to Insider Cannabis, our weekly newsletter where we’re bringing you an inside look at the deals, trends, and personalities driving the multibillion-dollar global cannabis boom.

Sign up here to get it in your inbox every week.

Happy Friday readers,

I hate to be cliche, but we are living in monumental times — with President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, it’s impossible to know what will happen next.

Despite the crush of the news cycle leading up to November, life still goes on, and Yeji and I still have a ton of cannabis news for you all.

Let’s get to it.

-Jeremy

Here’s what we wrote about this week:

Lawyers who specialize in cannabis are eyeing the burgeoning psychedelics industry as companies studying magic mushrooms go public

Lawyers who specialize in the cannabis industry say they’re getting inquiries from a new kind of client: psychedelics companies.

The calls started coming in around

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Tech Firms Accused Of Improper Data Handling

A new report indicates that US tech giants like Facebook and Netflix are failing to handle US-EU data transfers legally – but the US government is claiming that it shouldn’t be cause for concern.

Austrian privacy campaigner Max Schrems made use of his legal right to ask 33 companies how they handle personal data transfers such as which countries customer data is sent to and on what legal basis.

“The responses ranged from detailed explanations, to admissions that these companies have no clue what is happening, to shockingly aggressive denials of the law,” says Schrems.

Some companies, including Airbnb, Netflix, and WhatsApp didn’t reply to requests for information, while others simply redirected researchers to their privacy policies. Microsoft, says Schrems, answered every question – but claimed it could transfer personal data to the US under Standard Contractual Clauses, despite clearly providing data to the US government under FISA702.

“Overall,

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4 Reasons Why You Should Choose Full-Service Law Firms

In today’s dynamic and unpredictable environment, legal services have become a crucial part of our lives. They range from family issues, medical cases to personal injuries. Working with several lawyers from different law firms is considerably overwhelming and can be quite costly in the long run. This means that a client will spend unneeded time making ceaseless follow-ups to stay current on the progress of two or more legal actions. This is where full-service law firms come in handy, making the whole process a breeze to let their clients have peace of mind. Hiring a full-service firm gives a client confidence and helps to address any incoherent areas regarding their cases.

1. Family Law

Family disputes and matters are prevalent, and a professional firm can help in cases such as domestic violence, child support, child custody, parentage, nullity, divorce, and spousal support. A good business usually listens to the accounts … Read More