Gender discrimination is getting subtler but it’s still dangerous

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In 1959, Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated first in her class from Columbia Law School.

Thirty-four years later, at her confirmation hearing for the US Supreme Court, Ginsburg remembered the “many indignities” — instances of gender bias — that she’d faced during law school. Ginsburg, who passed away this month, was only one of a few women in her class, and at a dinner with the dean of the law school, they were asked to justify taking the place of a male applicant.

This behavior clearly wouldn’t fly in 2020. Administrators would be ousted; headlines would be made.

But gender discrimination is still part of most women’s daily lives.

In place of the flagrant offenses that Ginsburg and her classmates encountered is something more subtle. Educators, employers, and politicians all too frequently question women’s professional

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California governor signs law requiring trans inmates to be housed by gender identity

The law requires inmates to be asked how they identify, then they must be housed accordingly.

Governor Gavin Newsom signed a law on Saturday that will require California prisons to house transgender inmates according to their gender identity.

The law requires officers to privately ask inmates if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex. They must then be housed in the appropriate facility, and officers must refer to transgender inmates by their chosen pronouns.

Other legislation California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed requires better tracking of how diseases affect the LGBT community by public health officers, bans life and disability insurance companies from denying someone coverage solely because they have HIV. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Other legislation California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed requires better tracking of how diseases affect the LGBT community by public health officers, bans life and disability insurance companies from denying someone coverage solely because they have HIV. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation cannot deny those requests, the law says, solely because of inmates’ anatomy, sexual orientation or a “factor present” among other inmates at the facility.

It does note that

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California to House Transgender Inmates by Gender Identity

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Saturday requiring California to house transgender inmates in prisons based on their gender identity — but only if the state does not have “management or security concerns.”

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation houses men and women in separate facilities. Transgender inmates are often housed based on their sex assigned at birth. Advocates say this is dangerous, particularly for transgender women housed in facilities for men.

The law Newsom signed Saturday says officers must ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex. Those inmates can then request to be placed in a facility that houses either men or women.

The law says the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation cannot deny those requests solely because of inmates’ anatomy, sexual orientation or “a factor present” among other inmates at the facility.

But the

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CA Transgender Inmates Will Be Housed By Gender Identity; New Law

CALIFORNIA — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed new law Saturday that would require California to house transgender prisoners based on what gender they personally identify with. The request however, would be denied if any management of security issues were at stake.

The law also requires officers to address transgendered inmates based on the pronouns of their choice: he, she or they.

Traditionally, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation designates housing by their sex assigned at birth. But advocates have warned that this is dangerous, specifically for transgender women who are jailed among men.

The new law adds a preliminary step in the intake process and requires officers to ask all inmates, privately, to disclose if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex.

Then, inmates may request to be housed among men or women. And these requests cannot be denied based on an incoming inmates’ sexual anatomy, sexual orientation or a

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California Gov. Newsom signs law requiring transgender prison inmates to be housed based on gender identity

A new law signed by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Saturday requires the state to house transgender inmates in prisons based on their gender identity.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation houses men and women in separate facilities, and transgender inmates often are housed based on their biological sex. Advocates have argued that this is dangerous, particularly for transgender women housed in male facilities.

Gov. Gavin Newsom holds a face mask as he urges people to wear them to fight the spread of the coronavirus during a news conference in Rancho Cordova, Calif. 

Gov. Gavin Newsom holds a face mask as he urges people to wear them to fight the spread of the coronavirus during a news conference in Rancho Cordova, Calif. 
(AP)

The law says officers must ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex. Those inmates can then request placement in a facility that houses either men or women.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation cannot deny requests solely because of inmates’ anatomy, sexual orientation or “a factor

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Newsom signs law allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prisons according to gender identity

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law a bill allowing California transgender inmates to be placed in prisons that align with their gender identity.

“California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” Newsom said Saturday.

California corrections officers will now be required to privately ask inmates if they identify as transgender, nonbinary, or intersex. The inmates can then request to be placed in prisons that correspond with their gender identity if there are no “management or security concerns” with a particular inmate.

Newsom signed other laws on Saturday requiring local public health officials to more thoroughly track diseases affecting the gay and lesbian community, as well as a bill banning insurance companies from denying coverage based on HIV status.

“These new laws will help us better understand the impacts of COVID-19

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Newsom signs law allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prison by their gender identity

California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomOVERNIGHT ENERGY: California seeks to sell only electric cars by 2035 | EPA threatens to close New York City office after Trump threats to ‘anarchist’ cities | House energy package sparks criticism from left and right California seeks to sell only electric cars by 2035 EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters MORE (D) signed a bill Saturday allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prisons based on their gender identity. 

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will now house inmates based on their gender identity rather than their sex assigned at birth — but only if the state does not have “management or security concerns” with individual inmates. 

The law Newsom signed Saturday requires officers to ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex, then inmates can request to be placed in

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Gender Roles And Family Relationships In Early Day Haitian Society

Preamble

Gender roles and family relationships in Haiti have their roots in the diverse cultural backgrounds of the populace. Broadly speaking, the two major cultural influences are African and French. At one extreme is the African heritage. Among the Afro-Haitians who occupy the three lowest classes in the Haitian society, Middle Class, Urban Low Class and Rural Peasantry, the African cultural heritage is still very strong. This is particularly evident in the areas of marital relationships, defined roles of each gender before and after marriage, types of marriages and the extended family system. At the other extreme you have the Franco-Haitians or mulattoes, who have embraced French heritage wholesale, and who occupy the elite upper class of Haitian society.

Rural Haiti

Rural Haiti is where the vast majority of Haitians live and the people are mostly Afro-Haitians. In these parts of Haiti, the twin influences of their African heritage and … Read More