Tech giants have skirted regulation because of how monopolies are defined by law. Democrats now want to rewrite those laws.



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Jeff Bezos standing in front of a television: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images


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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images

  • Now that House Democrats have completed a sweeping antitrust investigation into Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google, they’re prepared to introduce new laws to curb the tech giants’ power.
  • The 449-page report published by the House Antitrust Subcommittee on Tuesday, as well as public statements by Democrats on the heels of the report, signal how they might go about changing the laws.
  • Antitrust court decisions in recent decades have focused on consumer welfare, but Democrats say laws need to be updated given that many tech companies don’t charge consumers for their products and have wide-ranging impacts on workers and other businesses.
  • Meanwhile, Republicans
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Turks fear new law to muzzle social media giants



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Photograph: Sedat Suna/EPA

When a team of 20 police officers demanded to search journalist Oktay Candemir’s flat earlier this month, he feared the worst: members of the Turkish media who are critical of the government are often arrested on spurious terrorism charges, and he has been in trouble several times before.

Instead, one of the officers pulled out a phone to remind Candemir of a jokey tweet he had sent a few days earlier, mocking a spate of new television shows about Ottoman sultans. “I was arrested under article 130, for insulting the memory of a dead person. They told me I was defaming the Ottoman sultans.”

After a night at the local police station in Van, Candemir was released on bail. He could now face two years in prison.

Candemir’s story is a particularly bizarre example of the capricious and heavy-handed ways Turkish law

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