Asia Society Hong Kong Thanksgiving Virtual Gala

This October 2020, Asia Society Hong Kong (ASHK) will celebrate its 30th anniversary.  We will hold a virtual Thanksgiving Gala on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. ASHK will take this momentous occasion to honor 12 visionaries who have been instrumental in the establishment of Asia Society in Hong Kong. We are delighted to honor Sir Q.W. Lee, Robert B. Oxnam, Jack Tang, Hong Kong Jockey Club, Robert and Chantal Miller, Mochtar Riady, Burton Levin, Nicholas Platt, Tung Chee-hwa, Chien Lee, Mary Lee Turner, and John S. Wadsworth Jr.

To show our appreciation at this time of giving, we will showcase ASHK’s diverse contribution to the city: Fireside chats with inspiring leaders of Hong Kong (12 highly respected honorees), in-depth and timely political discussion on the future of the Sino-American relationship under the new U.S. administration, and some special music performances. To conclude

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Academics warn of ‘chilling effect’ of Hong Kong security law | Higher education

Some of the world’s leading scholars on China have called for a united international front in defence of university freedoms, amid claims of an increased Chinese threat to academic inquiry since the passing of Hong Kong’s national security law.

Individual universities will be picked off unless there is a common agreement to resist Chinese state interference in academic research and teaching on China, a group of 100 academics including scholars in the US, UK, Australia and Germany say.

They highlight the threat posed by article 38 of the sweeping national security law, which states that the law is applicable to individuals who live outside the territory and individuals who do not come from there.

The law was imposed on Hong Kong by Beijing in June after more than a year of pro-democracy protests.

The academics say article 38 raises the unsettling prospect that students travelling through Hong Kong and China

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US blocks Hong Kong users from some government websites

The US has blocked Hong Kong residents from accessing at least two federal government websites that provide economic data, in a development that could fuel rising tensions between Washington and Beijing over the semi-autonomous territory.

The websites of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which publishes economic information including monthly jobs and unemployment figures, and the US Census Bureau, which releases data such as retail sales, new residential construction and international trade, have been inaccessible to Hong Kong internet users for months.

The Financial Times contacted multiple US government agencies for information on the reasons for the blocked websites in Hong Kong but received limited responses. 

A spokesperson for the Department of Labor, which includes the Bureau of Labor Statistics, declined to comment on “security procedures” but confirmed that “agencies began implementing geoblocks that included Hong Kong in January 2018” — nearly three years ago.

That would mean the measures started

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Relatives Accuse Hong Kong Government of Lying Over Surveillance of Detainees | World News

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Relatives of some of the 12 Hong Kong activists arrested by Chinese authorities at sea more than six weeks ago as they tried to flee by boat to Taiwan have accused the Hong Kong government of lying over the circumstances surrounding their capture.

The 12, who are accused of crimes tied to anti-government protests in Hong Kong last year, are being held in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen after mainland authorities intercepted their boat and accused them of illegal border crossing.

China’s foreign ministry has called them “separatists”.

The families said they had obtained the flight path of a Hong Kong government plane showing it was surveilling the boat the 12 were in, which led them to suspect local authorities helped Chinese officials.

They did not say how they obtained the data.

“Explain whether the police have deployed fixed-wing aircraft for aerial surveillance; give a

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Motley Fool to Leave Hong Kong, Citing National Security Law

(Bloomberg) — Motley Fool, the investing news site, said it will shut its Hong Kong operations because of the growing uncertainty of doing business in the city.



a group of people in uniform: Riot police raise a purple flag warning protesters of actions that violate the new national security law, during a protest on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Riot police flooded Hong Kong streets on a tense National Day, a show of force intended to back up leader Carrie Lam's morning declaration that stability had returned to the Asian financial center.


© Bloomberg
Riot police raise a purple flag warning protesters of actions that violate the new national security law, during a protest on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Riot police flooded Hong Kong streets on a tense National Day, a show of force intended to back up leader Carrie Lam’s morning declaration that stability had returned to the Asian financial center.

The publication, which expanded into Hong Kong in 2018, made the decision because of the difficulty foreseeing how the company would fare in the city in the coming years in the wake of the turmoil that’s been gripping the financial hub since last year, Hayes Chan, lead analyst at Motley Fool Hong Kong, wrote on the

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How HSBC got caught in a geopolitical storm over Hong Kong security law

HSBC has been a fixture of the Hong Kong economy for more than a century. However, its origins as a financial bridge between Asia and the west have placed it in the centre of a modern day geopolitical storm. Facing pressure to choose sides as Hong Kong is convulsed by the new security law imposed by Beijing and Donald Trump pursues a trade war with China, HSBC is in danger of finding itself without friends in either direction.

Headquartered in London, but dependent on Hong Kong and China for profits, HSBC has been affected by tensions between Washington and Beijing – and shareholder concern over its controversial acceptance of an authoritarian crackdown in its key market.

Last week that high-wire act was thrown into sharp relief when, despite HSBC’s public overtures to Beijing, a Chinese state-run newspaper reported the bank could be included on an official list – as

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How HSBC got caught in a geopolitical storm over Hong Kong security law | HSBC

HSBC has been a fixture of the Hong Kong economy for more than a century. However, its origins as a financial bridge between Asia and the west have placed it in the centre of a modern day geopolitical storm. Facing pressure to choose sides as Hong Kong is convulsed by the new security law imposed by Beijing and Donald Trump pursues a trade war with China, HSBC is in danger of finding itself without friends in either direction.

Headquartered in London, but dependent on Hong Kong and China for profits, HSBC has been affected by tensions between Washington and Beijing – and shareholder concern over its controversial acceptance of an authoritarian crackdown in its key market.

Last week that high-wire act was thrown into sharp relief when, despite HSBC’s public overtures to Beijing, a Chinese state-run newspaper reported the bank could be included on an official list – as yet

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Oxford is asking students specializing in China to submit papers anonymously so they don’t fall foul of Hong Kong’s draconian national security law



a person standing in front of a church: The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images


© Oil Scarff/Getty Images
The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Oil Scarff/Getty Images

  • The University of Oxford has told students of Chinese politics to submit work anonymously to avoid falling foul of China’s national security law, The Guardian reported Monday.
  • The law, imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, gave China the power to define and punish “separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference.”
  • But China says it applies to everyone, even those not in China or Hong Kong.
  • An associate professor of Chinese politics at Oxford, told The Guardian that students would be “submitting and presenting work anonymously in order to afford some extra protection.”
  • Princeton and Harvard Business School have also taken steps to safeguard students studying Chinese politics.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

The University of Oxford has asked students of Chinese politics to submit their work for grading anonymously so that they don’t

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Quiz: can you navigate your way through Hong Kong’s national security law? | World news

Since it was first enacted earlier this year, Beijing’s controversial national security law has impacted politicians, activists, journalists and everyday life in Hong Kong. The law seems to be intentionally opaque, giving the security forces the power to arrest people for a host of ill-defined breaches. Combined with pandemic laws against gatherings, they form a formidable tightening on the city’s freedoms.

Can you navigate your way through Hong Kong’s national security law?

We’ll start off very simply. When was Hong Kong’s new national law enacted?
This one is trickier. When was the law first published in full?
Which one of these items could you be arrested for holding in public?
""
Which of these slogans or songs are banned?
In which of these scenarios can Beijing exercise jurisdiction over national security cases?
"Attendees from various forces stand next to a banner supporting the new national security law during a flag-raising ceremony to mark China's National Day celebrations early morning in Hong Kong on July 1, 2020. - Hong Kong marks the 23rd anniversary of its handover to China on July 1 under the glare of a new national security law imposed by Beijing."
Hong Kong police have been granted new powers under the national security law. What are they?
"Hong Kong police"
You are an
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Oxford moves to protect students from China’s Hong Kong security law



a group of people on a newspaper: Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA

Students at Oxford University specialising in the study of China are being asked to submit some papers anonymously to protect them from the possibility of retribution under the sweeping new security law introduced three months ago in Hong Kong.

The anonymity ruling is to be applied in classes, and group tutorials are to be replaced by one-to-ones. Students are also to be warned it will be viewed as a disciplinary offence if they tape classes or share them with outside groups.

The Hong Kong security law was imposed on 30 June by Beijing after more than a year of pro-democracy protests, and had an immediately corrosive impact on political freedoms in the territory. Its provisions also give the Chinese government powers to arrest individuals who are not Hong Kong residents, for actions or comments made outside the territory.



a close up of a newspaper: Students at the University of Hong Kong walk past a poster supporting 12 Hongkongers detained in China.


© Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA

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