EU court rules against Hungary over law that targeted Soros-affiliated university | Hungary

The European Union’s highest court has ruled that changes by Hungary to its law on higher education, which effectively forced a university founded by George Soros to leave the country, were not in line with EU law.

The European court of justice (ECJ) ruled against prime minister Viktor Orbán’s government, saying in the ruling that “the conditions introduced by Hungary to enable foreign higher education institutions to carry out their activities in its territory are incompatible with EU law”.

At the heart of the conflict is the fate of the Central European University (CEU) established by Soros, a Hungarian-American financier. Under pressure from Orbán, it had to relocate most of its main activities to Vienna from Budapest, where it had been operating since the early 1990s.

Orbán has been a vocal critic of Soros for years, arguing that the billionaire philanthropist is intent on undermining European values with his liberal

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E.U. Court Rules Against Hungary Law Targeting Soros-Funded University

BUDAPEST — The European Court of Justice ruled on Tuesday that Hungary had violated E.U. rules by changing legislation in 2017 that effectively expelled an American university founded by the billionaire financier George Soros from the country.

“The conditions introduced by Hungary to enable foreign higher education institutions to carry out their activities in its territory are incompatible with E.U. law,” the court’s ruling said.

The decision was the latest effort by the European Union to curb growing authoritarianism by the government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, but is unlikely to have much impact on the ground in Hungary.

The ruling leaves no room for appeal, and requires Mr. Orban’s government to change the legislation to come in line with E.U. laws. If Hungary does not amend the law, the European Commission, the bloc’s executive arm, could request that the high court impose fines on the Hungarian government until it

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E.U. rule-of-law report angers Hungary, Poland

It was issued the same day that E.U. diplomats preliminarily agreed to tie access to E.U. funds to respecting the rule of law, as negotiations on a $2.1 trillion E.U. spending package accelerate in the coming weeks. Defenders of principles such as an independent judiciary and a free press have long accused the European Unionof enabling illiberal leaders by failing to cut off the E.U. money that props them up.

“We are trying to open a new chapter in defending and promoting the rule of law in the E.U.,” said Vera Jourova, the bloc’s rule-of-law chief. “Deficiencies often merge into an undrinkable cocktail even if individual ingredients seem to be fine.”

The European Union was founded as a club of democracies, but it has struggled to intervene over the last decade as Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban imposed stringent controls over the country’s judiciary, channeled public advertising funds to pro-government

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Hungary Says New EU Proposal on Rule of Law Conditions ‘Unacceptable’ | World News

BUDAPEST (Reuters) – Hungary considers a new proposal by the European Union presidency to tie future EU aid to rule of law conditions to be “unacceptable,” Justice Minister Judit Varga said on Tuesday.

She said on Facebook that the proposal, made this week by Germany as current president of the EU, would mean a unilateral modification of the bloc’s founding treaties. It would thereby violate the rule of law itself, and amounted to “blackmail”.

Hungary has often been at loggerheads with the EU over a perceived backslide from democratic standards, prompting the deputy head of the EU executive to describe Hungarian Premier Viktor Orban’s system as an “ailing democracy”.

Germany has floated a scheme that conditions access to EU money, including the 750-billion-euro ($879.68 billion) coronavirus recovery fund, to respect for the rule of law, a document seen by Reuters showed on Monday.

“In July, the heads of state and

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Hungary says new EU proposal on rule of law conditions ‘unacceptable’

BUDAPEST (Reuters) – Hungary considers a new proposal by the European Union presidency to tie future EU aid to rule of law conditions to be “unacceptable,” Justice Minister Judit Varga said on Tuesday.

She said on Facebook that the proposal, made this week by Germany as current president of the EU, would mean a unilateral modification of the bloc’s founding treaties. It would thereby violate the rule of law itself, and amounted to “blackmail”.

Hungary has often been at loggerheads with the EU over a perceived backslide from democratic standards, prompting the deputy head of the EU executive to describe Hungarian Premier Viktor Orban’s system as an “ailing democracy”.

Germany has floated a scheme that conditions access to EU money, including the 750-billion-euro ($879.68 billion) coronavirus recovery fund, to respect for the rule of law, a document seen by Reuters showed on Monday.

“In July, the heads of state and

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Hungary and Poland to set up rule-of-law institute to counter EU attacks

BUDAPEST (Reuters) – Hungary and Poland will set up a joint institute to assess the state of rule of law across European Union member states so that they are “not taken for fools” over allegations of rule of law breaches, Hungary’s foreign minister said on Monday.

After meeting Polish Foreign Minister Zbigniew Rau in Budapest, Peter Szijjarto said an EU report on the rule of law, which will soon be discussed in Brussels, was expected to be a political statement, rather than any well-founded assessment.

“The aim of this institute of comparative law would be that we should not be taken for fools,” Szijjarto said, adding that he had “had enough of some western European politicians using us as a punchbag”.

The institute would examine how the rule of law was upheld across the EU, to avoid “double standards” being applied to Hungary and Poland, he said.

The Law and

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Hungary and Poland to Set up Rule-Of-Law Institute to Counter EU Attacks | World News

BUDAPEST (Reuters) – Hungary and Poland will set up a joint institute to assess the state of rule of law across European Union member states so that they are “not taken for fools” over allegations of rule of law breaches, Hungary’s foreign minister said on Monday.

After meeting Polish Foreign Minister Zbigniew Rau in Budapest, Peter Szijjarto said an EU report on the rule of law, which will soon be discussed in Brussels, was expected to be a political statement, rather than any well-founded assessment.

“The aim of this institute of comparative law would be that we should not be taken for fools,” Szijjarto said, adding that he had “had enough of some western European politicians using us as a punchbag”.

The institute would examine how the rule of law was upheld across the EU, to avoid “double standards” being applied to Hungary and Poland, he said.

The Law and

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