AT&T has trouble figuring out where it offers government-funded Internet

An AT&T logo on the side of a building.

If you live in an area where AT&T has taken government funds in exchange for deploying broadband, there’s a chance you won’t be able to get the service—even if AT&T initially tells you it’s available.

AT&T’s Mississippi division has received over $283 million from the Federal Communications Commission’s Connect America Fund since 2015 and in exchange is required to extend home-Internet service to over 133,000 potential customer locations. As we previously reported, the Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) accused AT&T of submitting false coverage data to the FCC program. As evidence, Mississippi said its “investigation found concrete, specific examples that show AT&T Mississippi has reported location addresses… as being served when, in fact, the addresses are without service.”

AT&T has since provided an explanation that confirms it submitted false data on the serviceability of some addresses but says it will still meet the overall requirement of serving over 133,000 new

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EU’s top court limits government spying on citizens’ mobile and internet data

  • The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has ruled that member states cannot collect mass mobile and internet data on citizens.
  • It said forcing internet and phone operators to carry out the “general and indiscriminate transmission or retention of traffic data and location data” is against EU law.
  • The ruling is in response to several cases brought about by Privacy International and La Quadrature du Net.



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LONDON — The top court in the European Union has delivered another blow to governments seeking to keep tabs on citizens through controversial spying techniques. 

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The European Court of Justice (ECJ), the EU’s highest legal authority, ruled Tuesday that member states cannot collect mass mobile and internet data on citizens.

Forcing internet and phone operators to carry out the “general and indiscriminate transmission or retention of traffic data and location data” is against EU law, the court explained in

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The Federal Government Promised Native American Students Computers and Internet. Many Are Still Waiting.

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This story was co-published with The Arizona Republic, a member of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network.

Aubrie Sloan expected to start sixth grade in a virtual classroom where she would learn from her teacher each day and engage with classmates for the first time since the coronavirus forced her school to close in March.

Instead, she marks her attendance at Kaibeto Boarding School, on the western side of the Navajo Nation, by texting or calling her teacher each morning. Then she dives into paper packets the school delivers to her home, breezing through assignments that her mother says aren’t a challenge because she already knows the material.

Aside from two phone calls from her teacher, the 11-year-old has received little

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