Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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Japan must revise BOJ law to speed digital yen, enshrine inflation goal: senior official

By Leika Kihara and Takahiko Wada



Kozo Yamamoto wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Yamamoto speaks in Tokyo


© Reuters/Kim Kyung Hoon
FILE PHOTO: Yamamoto speaks in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan must swiftly revise laws to allow the central bank to issue a digital currency, a move that could provide a chance to reform the Bank of Japan’s existing mandates and enshrine its inflation target, a senior ruling party official said on Monday.

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Kozo Yamamoto, head of the Liberal Democratic Party’s (LDP) council on financial affairs, said the BOJ risked being overtaken by private players who could launch their own digital currencies that could undermine the yen.

“If something too convenient pops up from the private sector, people might start to doubt whether they need yen as a currency unit. We must prevent this from happening,” he said. “This is fundamentally about protecting Japan’s currency sovereignty.”

Yamamoto said he would prod the government and relevant agencies to speed up

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Japan health workers snub COVID-19 database as PM Suga seeks to digitize government

By Rocky Swift

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese health workers are snubbing the government’s real-time COVID-19 database introduced in the middle of the pandemic to better deal with outbreaks, pointing to hurdles for the new prime minister’s goal of digitising the government.

Just 40% of medical institutions are using the online database known as HER-SYS that was rolled out in May, a health ministry survey showed this week. Respondents complained that the system is too time consuming to use or duplicated work that they still have to do with paper forms and fax machines.

“There is a big shortage of personnel who can cope with this system,” said Satoru Hashimoto, the director of intensive care at the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine.

HER-SYS has a “notorious reputation” for requiring more than 120 fields to be filled in, said Fumie Sakamoto, the infection control manager at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo.

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Japan gov’t official asks public to cooperate in forming supportive society free of suicide

Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato (Mainichi/Daiki Takikawa)


TOKYO — Following an increase in suicides in Japan since July, including the deaths of several public figures, the country’s top government spokesman called on the public to cooperate in creating a society where individuals can look after and support one another, at a press conference on Sept. 28.


Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato said, “I would like people to build together a society where individuals can watch over each other while offering warm support so those who have various worries will not become isolated. I’d like to ask each member to help create a society free of suicide.”


Kato stated, “Signs pointing to an increase in the number of suicides have been seen since July, and we must take seriously this reality of many people taking their own precious lives.” He added, “As

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Japan government warns on suicide after death of actress

Japan’s government Monday urged people to seek help if they were struggling to cope, following the death at the weekend of a popular actress.

The death of “Miss Sherlock” star Yuko Takeuchi, 40, shocked the nation and follows other recent cases of Japanese celebrities taking their lives, with figures showing a recent rise in suicides.

Takeuchi was a household name in Japan and had given birth to her second child in January.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato did not mention a particular case, but noted some people were struggling to cope during the coronavirus crisis.

“There has been an uptick in the number of suicide cases since July. We have to acknowledge the fact that so many people are ending their precious lives,” said Kato, who was health minister until earlier this month.

He urged the public to use suicide-prevention hotlines and other services.

Takeuchi played the lead in the

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