Protests Spread Across Indonesia Over Jobs Law

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Riot police officers fired tear gas and water cannons in Indonesia’s capital on Thursday as they tried to disperse large crowds of people protesting a sweeping new law that slashes protections for workers and the environment.

In cities and towns throughout Indonesia’s vast archipelago, tens of thousands of workers took part in the third day of a national strike against the deregulation law. Workers marched on foot and rode in motorbike parades as sound trucks blared protest messages. Union leaders denounced Parliament and President Joko Widodo for pushing the measure through.

In the center of Jakarta, the capital, protesters assembled in defiance of a city ban on gathering during the pandemic and tried to march to the presidential palace. Some threw rocks at the police and set fires in the city center, burning a police post and two transit stops. The police said officers had detained more

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Clashes erupt in protests against new Indonesian jobs law

By Agustinus Beo Da Costa and Willy Kurniawan

JAKARTA (Reuters) – Police and demonstrators clashed in the Indonesian capital Jakarta on Thursday on the third day of protests and labour strikes against a polarising new jobs law passed in Southeast Asia’s largest economy earlier this week.

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered near the presidential palace in central Jakarta, shouting and throwing stones. Police responded by firing tear gas and water cannon in an attempt to disperse the crowd, Reuters witnesses said.

The “omnibus” jobs creation bill, passed into law on Monday, has seen thousands of people across the world’s fourth-most populous nation take to the streets in protest against legislation they say undermines labour rights and weakens environmental protections.

“We ask that the law be repealed immediately,” Maulana Syarif, 45, who has worked at Astra Honda motors for 25 years, told Reuters in Jakarta. “This is our struggle for our children

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Thousands protest against ‘omnibus law’ on jobs

Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets across Indonesia since Tuesday
Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets across Indonesia since Tuesday

Workers in Indonesia are protesting for the third straight day after a new job creation law was passed this week.

Thousands have taken part in strikes and demonstrations in several cities, with hundreds detained by the police.

Protesters are worried that the so-called “omnibus law” will hurt both workers and the environment.

But the government says the changes are needed to help its economy which has been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Demonstrations have gathered steam in the capital Jakarta and other cities such as Bandung on Wednesday and Thursday, after relatively peaceful protests earlier in the week.

Indonesian police detained at least 400 protesters, including some who were allegedly armed with molotov cocktails and sharp weapons.

The bill, which is over 1,000 pages long and amends 79 existing laws, was passed on Monday with the support

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Protests in Indonesia against new jobs law enter third day

The Daily Beast

South Korean Activists Accuse China of Using Huawei to Hack Their Election

Conservative critics of South Korea’s government persist in pressing claims of widespread fraud in the country’s April elections, pointing to what they say is new evidence—in the form of alleged electronic distortions and mail-in balloting irregularities—to suggest the country’s ruling party won its majority in the National Assembly with expertise and advice from China.The ongoing controversy comes as U.S. President Donald Trump and his Justice Department claim interference from China, not Russia, is the biggest threat to voting in the U.S. Facebook has already taken down a slew of China-linked pages targeting both Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden. (Meanwhile a Department of Homeland Security whistleblower says Trump allies interfered with intelligence reports to downplay Russia’s threat.)Charges of cheating in the South Korea assembly elections gained steam with the publication in May of a lengthy

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Indonesian police fire water cannons at protesters rallying against jobs law

Indonesian police used water cannons and tear gas on Tuesday to disperse protesters rallying against a new jobs law in two cities on the island of Java, according to a police spokesman and media reports.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Workers block a road during a strike against a government omnibus bill on job creation which they believe will deprive workers of their rights, in Bandung on October 6, 2020.


© TIMUR MATAHARI/AFP/Getty Images
Workers block a road during a strike against a government omnibus bill on job creation which they believe will deprive workers of their rights, in Bandung on October 6, 2020.

Earlier, thousands of workers and students had protested peacefully across the archipelago at the start of a three-day national strike against President Joko Widodo’s “omnibus” Job Creation bill, which was passed into law on Monday.

Elshinta radio posted a video on its official Twitter account showing police late in the evening using water cannons against hundreds of protesters in the city of Serang in Banten province, about 70 km (43.5 miles) to the west of Jakarta.

Banten police spokesman Edy

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Indonesia police arrest more than 20 as thousands protest against new jobs law

By Agustinus Beo Da Costa

JAKARTA (Reuters) – Indonesian police arrested 23 protesters in two industrial areas of Java island, using tear gas and water cannon as thousands across the country demonstrated against a new jobs law that critics say weakens worker rights and environmental regulation.

Edy Sumardi, a police spokesman in Banten on Java island, said on Wednesday that 14 demonstrators had been arrested in the province west of Jakarta during protests on Tuesday that continued into the evening.

Another police spokesman, Erdi Adrimulan Chaniago, said a further nine had been arrested in the city of Bandung, West Java. He said authorities would monitor factories and university campuses in case of further demonstrations.

The sweeping new legislation, passed into law by parliament on Monday, has been championed by the government of President Joko Widodo as key to boosting the competitiveness of Southeast Asia’s largest economy, hit hard by the

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Indonesians police fire water cannons at protesters rallying against jobs law

By Gayatri Suroyo and Fransiska Nangoy

JAKARTA (Reuters) – Indonesian police used water cannons and tear gas on Tuesday to disperse protesters rallying against a new jobs law in two cities on the island of Java, according to a police spokesman and media reports.

Earlier, thousands of workers and students had protested peacefully across the archipelago at the start of a three-day national strike against President Joko Widodo’s “omnibus” Job Creation bill, which was passed into law on Monday.

Elshinta radio posted a video on its official Twitter account showing police late in the evening using water cannons against hundreds of protesters in the city of Serang in Banten province, about 70 km (43.5 miles) to the west of Jakarta.

Banten police spokesman Edy Sumardi Priadinata said via text message that the situation was under control by 9:15 pm local time and that two police officers had been injured by

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Australia tips into record budget deficit as government cuts tax, boosts jobs support

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia pledged billions in tax cuts and measures to boost jobs on Tuesday to help pull the economy out of its historic COVID-19 slump in a budget that tips the country into its deepest deficit on record.

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks at Admiralty House in Sydney, Australia, February 28, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s conservative government has unleashed A$300 billion in emergency stimulus to prop up growth this year, backpedalling on a previous promise to return the budget to surplus.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg on Tuesday announced A$17.8 billion in personal tax cuts and A$5.2 billion in new programmes to boost employment in a recovery plan aimed at creating one million new jobs over the next four years.

Those measures are forecast to push the budget deficit out to a record A$213.7 billion, or 11% of gross domestic product, for the fiscal

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government scheme won’t save 5,500 jobs

Cineworld workers on zero-hours contracts in the UK could be left without pay beyond Thursday after the cinema chain’s chief executive said that the government’s job support scheme would not save 5,500 jobs.



graphical user interface: Photograph: Hollie Adams/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Mooky Greidinger, the Cineworld chief executive, whose family trust owns a fifth of the company shares, said the job support scheme “cannot work for us” because it did not help companies earning no income. The comments were contained in a memo sent to employees seen by the Guardian.

The job support scheme was a central plank in Rishi Sunak’s plan for the UK economy as the furlough scheme comes to an end. Under the scheme the government will support a maximum of only 22% of the salaries of workers on shortened hours – significantly less generous than the 80% offered at the start of the predecessor furlough scheme.

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Economy Adds 661,000 Jobs, Strengthening Case for Safely Reopening Society

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday that the unemployment rate fell to 7.9% as the economy gained 661,000 jobs in September, continuing to show signs of recovery and make the case that policymakers must continue to allow more parts of society to safely reopen.  

Although the unemployment rate beat experts’ predictions of 8.2%, the number of new jobs fell below predictions, largely due to closures of public schools and a decline in temporary workers for the 2020 census.

However, positive revisions to the July and August jobs reports added 145,000 more jobs than previously reported.        

The new jobs report shows that temporary layoffs decreased by 1.5 million, down from the high of 18.1 million in April but still 3.8 million higher than in February.  

In addition, the number of Americans who permanently lost their job increased by 345,000 to 3.8 million; this number has risen by 2.5 million since

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