John McAfee Arrested in Spain, and U.S. Seeks Extradition

John David McAfee, an antivirus software pioneer who fled Belize in 2012 ahead of a murder investigation there, has been arrested in Spain on tax evasion charges, the U.S. Justice Department said on Monday.

Mr. McAfee, 75, is a Silicon Valley legend who earned millions from the computer virus-fighting software company that still bears his surname. In 2012, he disappeared from his home in Belize after the local police sought him for questioning over the death of his neighbor.

He resurfaced in Guatemala City a few weeks later, then largely dropped out of the public eye for years — until 2016, when he attempted to run as a Libertarian candidate for president of the United States.

The Justice Department said on Monday that Mr. McAfee’s extradition from Spain to the United States was “pending.” It did not provide a timeline, and Mr. McAfee could not immediately be reached for comment

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Government Lawsuit Over John Bolton’s Memoir May Proceed, Judge Rules

A Justice Department spokeswoman, Kerri Kupec, said, “We are pleased with the ruling.”

Charles J. Cooper, a lawyer for Mr. Bolton, said that, “The court’s decision, which we are still studying, means that the case will now move forward to the phase in which the parties will develop and present their evidence to the court.”

The Bolton legal team has also asked Judge Lamberth, if he let the case proceed, to order the White House to turn over evidence to them about the process that administration officials used to handle the manuscript, letting his lawyers know what the government considers classified and permitting them to read internal White House emails and depose witnesses.

Ms. Knight has accused Trump political appointees of illegitimately politicizing the prepublication review process for Mr. Bolton’s book, and Mr. Bolton’s lawyers want to make the case that the government breached its own duty to handle the

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Judge rejects John Bolton bid to dismiss government lawsuit seeking book proceeds

“The government has the power to prevent harm to the national security,” Lamberth wrote in a 26-page opinion. “While the government may not prevent Bolton from publishing unclassified materials, it may require him to undergo a reasonable prepublication review process. The . . . agreements are thus consistent with the First Amendment.”

In a statement, lead Bolton attorney Charles J. Cooper said, “The Court’s decision, which we are still studying, means that the case will now move forward to the phase in which the parties will develop and present their evidence to the Court.”

Legal analysts said Lamberth’s opinion underscored that Bolton is in serious legal jeopardy, and made it more difficult for other national security professionals to publish without risk of being sued by the government.

“This is a horrible new precedent,” said Mark S. Zaid, a lawyer who specializes in national security and whistleblower cases. “Before this case

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Judge says government’s lawsuit against John Bolton over tell-all book can proceed

A federal judge in the District of Columbia has rejected former national security adviser John Bolton’s request to dismiss the government’s lawsuit complaining his tell-all book about his time in the Trump administration disclosed classified information after it failed to complete its prepublication review. 

Judge Royce Lamberth found that the government proved that the publication of Bolton’s book, “The Room Where it Happened,” improperly “breached his prepublication review and predisclosure consultation obligations” and “his nondisclosure obligations.” The government is seeking the profits Bolton has made from the bestselling book, which painted his former boss, President Trump, in an unflattering light. 

“The government has the power to prevent harm to the national security,” Lamberth wrote. “While the government may not prevent Bolton from publishing unclassified materials, it may require him to undergo a reasonable prepublication review process.”

“We are pleased with the ruling,” Justice Department sppokeswoman Kerri Kupec told CBS News. 

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Judge says government’s suit over John Bolton book can proceed

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration can move forward with its lawsuit against former National Security Adviser John R. Bolton over his tell-all book, a judge ruled Thursday in denying a request to dismiss the complaint.

The Justice Department alleges that Bolton’s book, “The Room Where It Happened” contains classified information, and the government sued in June to try to prevent the release. Though the book was published as scheduled, a suit accusing Bolton of breaking contracts with the government by disclosing classified information and by failing to complete a required prepublication review can proceed, U.S District Judge Royce Lamberth said in a 27-page opinion.

The Justice Department, the judge wrote, “plausibly pleads that Bolton breached those obligations.” A lawyer for Bolton did not immediately return an email seeking comment.

The book, which details Bolton’s 17 months as Trump’s national security adviser, contains descriptions of conversations with foreign leaders that

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Judge rejects John Bolton’s effort to dismiss government lawsuit over book

A federal judge on Thursday denied former Trump national security adviser John Bolton’s effort to get the government’s lawsuit over his book dismissed.

That allows the Justice Department to proceed in its effort to seize his profits from the book, “The Room Where it Happened,” a harsh condemnation of the Trump White House and its handling of foreign policy.

Federal District Court Judge Royce Lamberth said the government “alleges sufficient facts to support its claim” that Bolton violated his obligations to get written permission to proceed with publication after the book was reviewed to remove any classified information. The judge found the government has a sufficiently strong case to move on to the next step.

Justice Department lawyers have asked the judge to rule for them on summary judgment, without a trial. The judge said he will rule on that soon.

The government filed its lawsuit in June, arguing that

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Five Reasons Graduates Of John Marshall Law School Pass The Bar And Find Employment

John Marshall Law School

The John Marshall Law school has a famous name, an aggressive curriculum and stays on the forefront of legal issues. This combination benefits the future lawyers who grace these hallowed halls. With over 85% of the graduates passing the bar and having a job within nine months, this school does it right. Not only does the training facility feature a strong structure of curriculum and practice, it embraces technology, attacks innovative issues and customize the training process.

Five Reasons Graduates Of John Marshall Law School Pass The Bar And Find Employment

Name

John Marshall was an influential 19th century US Supreme Court Chief Justice responsible for making the Supreme Court an equal branch of the government along with the legislature and executive branches. Under his 30+ years of guidance, the federal court system developed policies for disregarding laws contrary to the Constitution. Although the school bearing … Read More