Muslim protesters march against Indonesia’s new labor law

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Thousands of conservative Muslims marched in Indonesia’s capital on Tuesday demanding that the government revoke a new law they say will cripple labor rights, with some clashing with police.

Authorities blocked streets leading to the Presidential Palace in Jakarta, where clashes between riot police and rock-throwing demonstrators, including workers and students, broke out last Thursday.

The protests spread and turned violent in some cities across the world’s most populous Muslim nation, but calm had largely returned to Jakarta over the past four days.

On Tuesday, the normally clogged streets of Jakarta were nearly empty of cars, embassies were closed and many businesses were shuttered for the day after several Muslim groups announced they would stage protests.

Waving black flags bearing the Islamic declaration of faith, several thousand demonstrators, many wearing white Islamic robes, filled a major thoroughfare.

The Job Creation Law approved by Parliament last week is

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Law School Grad Goes Into Labor During Bar Exam, Finishes Test

A recent law school grad who was taking the bar exam in order to become a lawyer was complicated by the fact that her water broke mid-exam. She completed the test afterward. 

Brianna Hill, who just completed law school at Chicago’s Loyola University, took her bar exam last Monday, which lined up with her 38th week of pregnancy. Like a lot of things this year the timing had been junked up by the pandemic, which ended up pushing her exam date back to Oct. 5. As one might expect, that switch of dates proved pretty stressful.

“I thought I would only be 28 weeks pregnant when I took the bar,” Hill said to CNN. “However, due to the pandemic, the test was pushed to October and I was going to be 38 weeks. I joked about taking the test from my hospital bed. Lesson learned!”

Reports state that Hill had

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Sweden’s PM Given Breathing Space to Salvage Labor Law Talks

(Bloomberg) — On Sunday night Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven was granted a last minute reprieve to avoid a political crisis that threatens to engulf him.

Lofven and his government face a vote of no confidence from the Left Party unless controversial changes to the country’s labor laws are scrapped. Opposition parties the Christian Democrats, the Sweden Democrats and the Moderates have also said they would back the vote.

But the Left Party’s Jonas Sjostedt, speaking on a party leaders’ debate on state broadcaster SVT, said that he’s prepared to give the Social Democrat-led government “a little bit more time.”

“It could be worth doing this for a couple of weeks,” Sjostedt said. “I’m prepared to talk, because this can be solved.”

That now gives Lofven some space to rescue last month’s failed set of labor talks. However, the prime minister’s task remains a daunting one with his budget

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Hundreds arrested at labor law demonstrations

Indonesian police arrested 400 people Thursday at protests in the capital Jakarta against a contentious new jobs-creation law that critics say undermines workers’ rights, state news agency Antara reported.



a group of people standing around a fire: A protester throws a traffic cone onto a fire during Thursday in Jakarta.


© Ed Wray/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
A protester throws a traffic cone onto a fire during Thursday in Jakarta.

At least 60 demonstrators and six police were injured at the demonstration near the Presidential Palace during the third day of a nationwide strike and demonstrations in the Southeast Asian nation, the news agency reported.

Videos showed protesters shouting, throwing stones, breaking into buildings and setting fires near the national palace as police deployed water cannon and tear gas to disperse the crowds.

The Indonesian Red Cross said some protesters were suffering from a shortness of breath after police fired tear gas. They also fired water cannon to disperse the crowd.

Critics say the new legislation, locally known as the “omnibus

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Jakarta protests: Hundreds arrested at labor law demonstrations

At least 60 demonstrators and six police were injured at the demonstration near the Presidential Palace during the third day of a nationwide strike and demonstrations in the Southeast Asian nation, the news agency reported.

A protester throws a traffic cone onto a fire during Thursday in Jakarta.

Videos showed protesters shouting, throwing stones, breaking into buildings and setting fires near the national palace as police deployed water cannon and tear gas to disperse the crowds.

The Indonesian Red Cross said some protesters were suffering from a shortness of breath after police fired tear gas. They also fired water cannon to disperse the crowd.

Critics say the new legislation, locally known as the “omnibus law,” scraps some labor rights, indigenous community rights and environmental protections. They also complain the legislation was rushed through parliament without consultation with unions.

President Joko Widodo has touted the law as a tool to create new jobs, reform labor regulations, cut red tape and attract foreign investment.

Protests

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Protests against new labor law turn violent across Indonesia

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Protests in many Indonesian cities turned violent Thursday as thousands of enraged students and workers criticized a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment.

Clashes between rock-throwing demonstrators and riot police broke out near Jakarta’s presidential palace as police tried to disperse the protesters, including workers and high school and university students.

President Joko Widodo is visiting Central Kalimantan province and was not in the palace.

Police fired tear gas at the protesters from several high schools and universities as they tried to approach the palace compound, turning roads into a smoke-filled battleground. The protesters fought back, hurling rocks and bottles.

An angry mob burned a traffic police post at an intersection near the palace, while other protesters set fires to tires and fiberglass road barriers. As night fell, some protesters set fire to a subway shelter in downtown Jakarta, causing

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Indonesia students, workers rally against new labor law

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Thousands of enraged students and workers staged rallies across Indonesia on Thursday in opposition to a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment.

The Job Creation Law approved by Parliament on Monday is expected to substantially change Indonesia’s labor system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws and was intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment to the country.

The demonstrators say the law will hurt workers by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labor by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly wages to hourly.


Police in the capital, Jakarta, prevented labor groups from holding a mass rally in front of Parliament, and they have held at least 200 high school students who were attempted to reach the parliament compound for protests, Jakarta

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Why thousands of labor activists protest Indonesia Job Creation Law

Bandung and Jakarta, Indonesia

Thousands of Indonesian students and workers protested on Wednesday against a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment, with some clashing with police. 

The new Job Creation Law, which was approved Monday, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labor system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labor Law, the Spatial Planning Law, and Environmental Management Law.

It is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people. Supporters of the law say it will increase employment at a time when a recession looms and when Indonesia is competitively falling behind other Southeast Asian countries.

Seven parties in the House of Representatives approved the legislation while two others rejected it,

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Indonesia’s Labor Law Sees Stocks Rally as Workers Protest

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia’s new law, aimed to simplify labor and investment rules, has been met with a rally in local markets and concern from global investors as well as labor unions.



a group of people walking down the street: Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.


© Bloomberg
Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.

Parliament agreed to pass the omnibus bill on jobs creation in a plenary session Monday, sending the rupiah and stocks to gain as much as 1.3% the next day. The vote was brought forward from Oct. 8, preempting a three-day strike by about 2 million workers who sought to reject it. The strike will still happen from Tuesday.

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Indonesian Workers Rally Against New Job Bill, Massive Layoffs

The law, which revises more than 70 existing regulations, has aroused controversy since President Joko

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Indonesia Passes Law to Simplify Labor, Investment Rules

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia has rushed the approval of a law aimed at creating jobs and attracting investments, a day before 2 million workers were set to stage a three-day strike to reject it.



a group of people walking down the street: Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.


© Bloomberg
Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.

The parliament agreed to pass the omnibus bill on jobs in a plenary meeting on Monday. It was previously set to hold the meeting on Oct. 8.

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The law that seeks to simplify and revise more than 70 existing regulations will overhaul the country’s labor rules, make it easier for companies to secure permits and ease foreign ownership requirements. Its passage sets the income tax from capital gains to 20%, while some dividend taxes will be exempted.

Indonesian Workers Rally

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