Health care law on line at court, but is it likely to fall?

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump’s nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage.

But that’s not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10, just one week after the election.

Yes, the Trump administration is asking the high court to throw out the Obama-era healthcare law, and if she is confirmed quickly Barrett could be on the Supreme Court when the court hears the case.

But even if the justices agree that the law’s mandate to buy health insurance is unconstitutional because Congress repealed the penalties for not complying, they could still leave the rest of the law alone. That would be consistent with other rulings in which the court excised a problematic provision from a law that was otherwise allowed to remain

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The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Senate panel votes to subpoena Twitter, Facebook, Google CEOs |  ‘Trump fatigue’ spells trouble |  Senate GOP frustrated after Tuesday’s debate |  Trump signs funding bill after short lapse | NYC becomes first big city to reopen all schools |  Five cursing parrots separated

 

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Via The Hill’s Niv ElisPresident TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump signs bill averting shutdown after brief funding lapse Privacy, civil rights groups demand transparency from Amazon on election data

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Kentucky lawmaker, sponsor of ‘Breonna’s Law,’ back on protest line after arrest

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The state lawmaker behind a police reform bill known as “Breonna’s Law” was back on the streets with protesters Friday after being arrested with a group of demonstrators the previous night.

Rep. Attica Scott, D-Frankfort, joined a few hundred others downtown for the third night of demonstrations after the state attorney general announced Wednesday that no charges would be brought against police for the killing of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman who was asleep in her home when officers came to her door.

“Every day this week, the numbers have grown, especially after the unjust arrests this week,” Scott said Friday, referring to the arrests of herself and others. “It’s beautiful, it’s amazing and it’s what we’ve been pushing for months now: love, community and solidarity.”

A protester is detained by Louisville Police officers during a march, at a memorial in Louisville, Kentucky, on Sept. 25, 2020.
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