Portland protests: Man facing charges after damage to Oregon Historical Society

Malik Fard Muhamad was charged with one count of unlawful possession of a firearm, one count of possession of a loaded firearm in public, one count of criminal mischief in the first degree and one count of riot.

CNN has reached out to Muhamad and his family for a statement.

Activists called for people to march Sunday for an “Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage,” the day before the federally recognized Columbus Day. Police declared the protest a riot after the group of about 300 people vandalized businesses and toppled statues of Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

Law enforcement identified Muhamad as part of a group of people wearing all black and vandalizing buildings, according to a news release from the Multnomah County District Attorney’s office. Muhamad ran from police as they attempted to arrest him, the release said.

During the arrest, police found a pistol behind barrels he was hiding

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Man facing charges after damage to Oregon Historical Society

An Indiana man has been charged after allegedly using a metal baton to smash out windows at the Oregon Historical Society and Portland State University during protests throughout the city on Sunday.



A woman pulls a quilt from the display case inside the Oregon Historical Society during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest.


© Nathan Howard/Getty Images
A woman pulls a quilt from the display case inside the Oregon Historical Society during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest.

Malik Fard Muhamad was charged with one count of unlawful possession of a firearm, one count of possession of a loaded firearm in public, one count of criminal mischief in the first degree and one count of riot.

CNN has reached out to Muhamad and his family for a statement.

Activists called for people to march Sunday for an “Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage,” the day before the federally recognized Columbus Day. Police declared the protest a riot after the group of about 300 people vandalized businesses and toppled statues of

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Society’s ‘man up’ message fueling suicide among men

By Tony Mushoborozi

On July 2, Hussein Walugembe, a boda-boda cyclist from Masaka, walked into Masaka Central Police Station, doused himself in petrol and set himself ablaze. In a news report published by this paper, Walugembe’s motorcycle had reportedly been impounded for violating curfew guidelines. According to his friends,  since this was his only source of income, he decided to commit suicide after failing to reach an agreement with the officers in charge on when he would get his motorcycle back.

Two months before the incident, on May 12, another story was published by several media houses in the country. A 30-year-old man in Kabale District had committed suicide by hanging after he allegedly failed to raise Shs1,000 to buy salt for his family. 

Justina Nakimuli, a psychiatric specialist based in Manchester, United Kingdom, who also runs a private practice in Kampala, says men are more prone to suicidal behaviour

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Man Gets 16 Months in Prison Over Stolen Valor Government Fraud Scheme

A 43-year-old California man named James Stiles has been sentenced to 16 months in federal prison and ordered to pay $167,234 in restitution for pretending to be a Marine wounded in battle just to obtain medical and housing benefits.

Stiles continued his “stolen valor” scheme, the phrase for when someone pretends to be a military veteran, for four years before he was caught.

Stiles was found guilty of seven counts of government fraud including $194,526 in medical visits and $3,771 in housing payments that he received from Veterans Affairs (VA) by claiming to have served in the military from 1995 to 2005. He told VA officials that he had served on a combat tour in March 2005 and won two Purple Heart medals for being injured in the line of duty, according to the Marine Corps Times.

He first applied for healthcare benefits in November 2012. Over the next

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No action against man who ended Texas church shooting: Grand Jury


Associated Press

Published 5:57 p.m. ET Sept. 29, 2020

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Jack Wilson, 71, poses for a photo at a firing range outside his home in Granbury, Texas, on Monday. (Photo: Jake Bleiberg, AP)

FORT WORTH, Texas — A grand jury in Texas decided Monday to take no action against a man who fatally shot an armed man who killed two people at a Fort Worth-area church in late December, prosecutors said.

Jack Wilson, a firearms instructor who trained a volunteer security team at the West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement, fatally shot Keith Thomas Kinnunen during a Dec. 29 service after Kinnunen shot and killed 67-year-old Richard White, another security volunteer, and 64-year-old Anton “Tony” Wallace, a server. 

As the attacker shot the two men, congregants scrambled for cover. The gunman was heading to the front of the sanctuary as Wilson searched for a clear line of fire.

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