Madrid regional chief hits out at Spanish government Covid measures

The woman at the heart of the dispute over one of Europe’s coronavirus hotspots says Spain’s government is exacerbating the crisis and depicts herself as a bulwark against socialist revolutionaries in its ranks. 

To her supporters, Isabel Díaz Ayuso, head of Madrid’s regional government and perhaps the second most powerful elected official in the country, is the voice of resistance against a dangerous leftwing government running roughshod over democratic institutions and devastating the motor of the Spanish economy. 

To her detractors, the leader of the region of 6.6m people is a rightwing ideologue who has been far too slow in responding to some of the highest infection rates in Europe.

Ms Díaz Ayuso, a 41-year-old who took office last year after a career largely spent in communications for her centre-right People’s party, portrays the regional administration as one of the most important checks on what she says is an “authoritarian”

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Harris team assured by VP debate safety measures

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the 2020 presidential election (all times local):

8:20 p.m.

Kamala Harris’ chief of staff says the Democratic campaign is confident in the safety measures for Wednesday’s vice presidential debate.

But Karine Jean-Pierre also called it “shameful” that Vice President Mike Pence’s team objected to the use of a plexiglass barrier between the candidates. She noted that Pence heads the White House’s coronavirus task force and says he and his team should want more protection for him and people involved in the debate.

Her comments came during an interview Tuesday on CNN.


Harris and Pence will meet Wednesday night at the University of Utah for the only vice presidential debate.

Jean-Pierre says Harris is well-prepared to show viewers the contrast between President Donald Trump’s handling of the pandemic and how she and Joe Biden would approach it.

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Lt. Collins’ Law Among New MD Measures Taking Effect Oct. 1

By Philip Van Slooten, CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE

ANNAPOLIS, MD — An update to Maryland’s hate crimes law, named for slain Army 2nd Lt. Richard Collins III, is one of several anti-discrimination measures going into effect Oct. 1. Other notable bills address crime, the environment and healthcare, including an infectious disease mandate named for Olivia Paregol, a University of Maryland freshman who died during a 2018 campus outbreak.

Collins’ Law – HB917/SB606. Sponsored by Delegate C. T. Wilson, D-Charles, and Sen. Joanne C. Benson, D-Prince George’s, this hate crimes update was named in honor of the Bowie State University ROTC candidate who was murdered by Sean Urbanski at a University of Maryland, College Park bus stop in 2017.

“He was a young rising star, a young military officer about to be commissioned,” state Sen. William C. Smith Jr., D-Montgomery, said of Collins, who was Black.

While Urbanski, who is white, was

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Government promises to hold votes ‘wherever possible’ on nationwide measures after Tory rebellion



a group of people walking down the street


© Provided by The Independent


Matt Hancock has unveiled a government concession giving MPs a say in future “significant national measures” to tackle the coronavirus pandemic, including holding votes wherever possible.

In response to mounting frustration over the introduction of new Covid-19 rules and a lack of parliamentary oversight, the health secretary said he had listened to concerns raised by dozens of backbench Conservatives, who had threatened a rebellion.

His comments followed the dramatic intervention from Sir Lindsay Hoyle, the Commons speaker, who rebuked Boris Johnson’s government for treating parliament with “contempt” and pushing through sweeping restrictions in a “totally unsatisfactory” way.

During a press conference at Downing Street on Wednesday evening, the prime minister also warned he would “not hesitate” to impose further national restrictions if the evidence from scientific advisers required it.

Opening a debate on the Coronavirus Act, which provides ministers with the powers to enact draconian

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UK Commons Speaker accuses government of bypassing lawmakers on virus measures

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s parliamentary Speaker reprimanded Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government on Wednesday for disregarding the House of Commons with its COVID-19 measures, calling on ministers to better include lawmakers in their decisions.

But Lindsay Hoyle decided against allowing lawmakers the chance to consider a so-called amendment to a vote on the extension of emergency laws to impose restrictions that would have made sure parliament played a greater role.

Several lawmakers from Johnson’s own Conservative Party have threatened to rebel against the government over renewing the Coronavirus Act, which some said had allowed it to govern by diktat and deprive people of their civil liberties.

“The way in which the government has exercised its powers to make secondary legislation during this crisis has been totally unsatisfactory,” Hoyle told parliament, adding some explanations the government had offered on why it had bypassed parliament showed a “total disregard” for lawmakers.

“The

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UK parliamentary Speaker accuses government of bypassing lawmakers on virus measures

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s parliamentary Speaker reprimanded Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government on Wednesday for disregarding the House of Commons with its COVID-19 measures, calling on ministers to better include lawmakers in their decisions.

But Lindsay Hoyle decided against allowing lawmakers the chance to consider a so-called amendment to a vote on the extension of emergency laws to impose restrictions that would have made sure parliament played a greater role.

Several lawmakers from Johnson’s own Conservative party have threatened to rebel against the government over renewing the Coronavirus Act, which some said had allowed it to govern by diktat and deprive people of their civil liberties.

A rebellion would dent Johnson’s authority and ministers have been trying to defuse any revolt by promising parliament they would involve it more.

“The way in which the government has exercised its powers to make secondary legislation during this crisis has been totally unsatisfactory,”

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UK government moves to defuse row with lawmakers over coronavirus measures

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s government moved to defuse a row with lawmakers over the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis on Monday, promising to engage with them more on restrictions some have complained impinge on society’s freedoms.

Some Conservative lawmakers have criticised the government after ministers announced a ban gatherings of more than six people and introduced a range of other fines, saying ministers were “ruling by decree” and undermining the role of parliament.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, criticised for his handling of the COVID-19 crisis, is keen to prevent a rebellion on Wednesday when parliament will vote on the renewal of the Coronavirus Act, which hands the government powers to impose restrictions.

Ministers were at pains to say they would ensure parliament was more involved in agreeing any further national measures.

“We’re looking at further ways to ensure the House (of Commons) can be properly involved in the process,

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