As Donald Trump’s Law-and-Order Message Fails In Minnesota, Campaign Moves Money to Must-Win Florida

The release on bail of Derek Chauvin, the officer charged in George Floyd’s death, prompted yet another surge of unrest in Minnesota. But even as demonstrations filled the streets for a second night, Donald Trump’s campaign was pulling ad money out of the state. The president’s law-and-order message, which campaign officials had expected to resonate in the protest-torn state, wasn’t working.



a group of people posing for the camera: Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.


© KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images
Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.

Trump taking down the fabled “blue wall” of Rust Belt states—Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan—was the most shocking component of his historic upset in 2016. Just as unexpected, to Democrats, pollsters and political pundits, was this: he nearly won Minnesota, falling just 1.5 points behind Hillary Clinton in what was supposed to be the bluest of blue

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UK government moves to defuse row with lawmakers over coronavirus measures

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s government moved to defuse a row with lawmakers over the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis on Monday, promising to engage with them more on restrictions some have complained impinge on society’s freedoms.

Some Conservative lawmakers have criticised the government after ministers announced a ban gatherings of more than six people and introduced a range of other fines, saying ministers were “ruling by decree” and undermining the role of parliament.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, criticised for his handling of the COVID-19 crisis, is keen to prevent a rebellion on Wednesday when parliament will vote on the renewal of the Coronavirus Act, which hands the government powers to impose restrictions.

Ministers were at pains to say they would ensure parliament was more involved in agreeing any further national measures.

“We’re looking at further ways to ensure the House (of Commons) can be properly involved in the process,

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Oxford moves to protect students from China’s Hong Kong security law



a group of people on a newspaper: Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA

Students at Oxford University specialising in the study of China are being asked to submit some papers anonymously to protect them from the possibility of retribution under the sweeping new security law introduced three months ago in Hong Kong.

The anonymity ruling is to be applied in classes, and group tutorials are to be replaced by one-to-ones. Students are also to be warned it will be viewed as a disciplinary offence if they tape classes or share them with outside groups.

The Hong Kong security law was imposed on 30 June by Beijing after more than a year of pro-democracy protests, and had an immediately corrosive impact on political freedoms in the territory. Its provisions also give the Chinese government powers to arrest individuals who are not Hong Kong residents, for actions or comments made outside the territory.



a close up of a newspaper: Students at the University of Hong Kong walk past a poster supporting 12 Hongkongers detained in China.


© Photograph: Jérôme Favre/EPA

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Oxford moves to protect students from China’s Hong Kong security law | Education

Students at Oxford University specialising in the study of China are being asked to submit some papers anonymously to protect them from the possibility of retribution under the sweeping new security law introduced three months ago in Hong Kong.

The anonymity ruling is to be applied in classes, and group tutorials are to be replaced by one-to-ones. Students are also to be warned it will be viewed as a disciplinary offence if they tape classes or share them with outside groups.

The Hong Kong security law was imposed on 30 June by Beijing after more than a year of pro-democracy protests, and had an immediately corrosive impact on political freedoms in the territory. Its provisions also give the Chinese government powers to arrest individuals who are not Hong Kong residents, for actions or comments made outside the territory.

The powerful extraterritorial powers claimed in the law have led to fears

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