MPs reject calls by campaigners to enshrine food safety in UK law

Farmers and food campaigners were defeated on Monday night in their attempts to enshrine high food safety and animal welfare practices in British law.



a tractor in front of a building: A demonstration by farmers outside the Houses of Parliament ahead of the vote.


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A demonstration by farmers outside the Houses of Parliament ahead of the vote.

Several prominent backbench Tory MPs rebelled against the government to vote for amendments to the agriculture bill that would have given legal status to the standards, but the rebels were too few to overcome the government’s 80-seat majority and the key amendment fell by 332 votes to 279 after an often impassioned debate.

The government argued that giving current standards legal status was unnecessary as ministers had already committed to ensuring that UK food standards would be kept in any post-Brexit trade agreements. However, critics fear that the lack of a legally binding commitment in the agriculture bill will allow future imports of sub-standard food that will undercut British produce

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Labour MPs urge Starmer to get tough with government on Covid | Labour

Keir Starmer is facing pressure from Labour MPs whose local economies could be hit by the latest Covid curbs to take a tougher stance against the government’s approach.

MPs are expected to be offered votes on Tuesday on the 10pm pubs and restaurants curfew and aspects of the new tiered restrictions.

The Labour leader, who has adopted a policy of “constructive opposition” throughout the pandemic, said last week his party would abstain on any vote on the 10pm curfew.

But a growing number of Labour MPs believe the time has come for what one called “a parting of the ways” with the government on its management of the crisis.

The former shadow communities secretary Andrew Gwynne said he would oppose 10pm closing if MPs were given a straight vote. The MP for Denton and Reddish in Greater Manchester said a briefing by the chief medical officer, Prof Chris Whitty, last

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UK coronavirus news: Johnson warned ‘rule of law’ at risk if MPs don’t get more of a say over Covid rules | Politics

Good morning. Brexit was supposed to be about parliament “taking back control” but one of the extraordinary ironies of 2020 is that Britain’s departure from the European Union has coincided with the government implementing the most draconian restrictions on ordinary life seen in peacetime – mostly with MPs having no say over the process at all. The key lockdown measures have become law as regulations passed under emergency powers, Because of the way such secondary legislation is scrutinised, MPs have not had the chance to vote before the laws take effect, the few votes that have taken place have been retrospective (after the laws are already in place) and mostly the regulations have not been subject to votes or debates at all.

Now many MPs have had enough. There will be a debate tonight on extending the powers in the Coronavirus Act and many amendments have been tabled saying MPs

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Brexit: Government Brexit plan gets MPs’ final backing

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MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

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Brexit: Government plan gets MPs’ final backing

FlagsImage copyright
PA Media

MPs have given their final backing to government plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which passed through the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256, will now go to the House of Lords.

The government says it will help protect the integrity of the UK.

But Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the EU argue that – in allowing the government to undo parts of a treaty signed by the EU and UK – it could damage the country’s international reputation and standing.

The UK’s five living former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May – have spoken out

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Brexit: MPs to vote again on government’s plan

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MPs are set to vote once again on Tuesday whether to back the government’s plans to override parts of its Brexit agreement with the EU.

Amid concerns that the move would break international law, ministers have agreed to give Parliament a say before ever using the powers they would be granted by the Internal Market Bill.

The legislation is expected to pass before going to the House of Lords.

But former Prime Minister Theresa May has said she “cannot support” it.

It is not known whether Mrs May – one of several Conservative MPs who have raised concerns over possibly undoing parts of a treaty signed with the EU – will actually vote against her successor Boris Johnson’s government.

The parliamentary debate comes as the EU and the UK begin a ninth – and final – scheduled round of talks aimed at securing a trade deal.

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Coronavirus: Support grows for rebel MPs over law

Labour is “very sympathetic” to a bid by Conservative MPs to increase parliamentary scrutiny over coronavirus restrictions in England, shadow justice secretary David Lammy has said.

Tory Sir Graham Brady wants MPs to have a say on changes to lockdown rules.

Ex-Commons Speaker John Bercow and Steve Baker, a former Brexit minister, have also spoken in favour of the move.

The government says it wants to work with MPs while ensuring ministers can react quickly to suppress the virus.

It has also said MPs will get the chance to vote retrospectively on the ‘rule of six’, which puts a limit on the number of people at social gatherings.

Mr Lammy told the BBC’s Andrew Marr he was “very sympathetic” to the amendment.

“We need more transparency… and we should be debating the regulations and rules for the country,” he said.

However he avoided committing support to Sir Graham, pointing out

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Coronavirus: Labour ‘sympathetic’ to rebel MPs over virus law

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Labour is “very sympathetic” to a bid by Conservative MPs to increase parliamentary scrutiny over coronavirus restrictions in England, shadow justice secretary David Lammy has said.

Senior Tory Sir Graham Brady has tabled an amendment which would allow MPs to vote on changes to lockdown rules.

Several Tory MPs and the Lib Dems have also signalled support for the move.

The government has said it is working closely with MPs “to ensure they could hold the government to account”.

Mr Lammy told the BBC’s Andrew Marr he was “very sympathetic” to the amendment.

“We need more transparency… and we should be debating the regulations and rules for the country,” he said.

However he avoided committing support to Sir Graham, pointing out that Labour would table its own amendment and would wait and see if it was selected by Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle this week.

In

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