Twitter to pay $100,000 for violating Washington campaign disclosure law

Twitter will pay $100,000 for failing to retain required records about political ads from Washington candidates that ran over a seven-year period before the social media platform banned all political advertising.

Twitter agreed to pay the fine, which is about half the amount the company received from Washington candidates’ political advertising from 2012 to 2019, to Washington’s Public Disclosure Transparency Account, Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced Tuesday. The fine comes after Ferguson announced his intention over the summer to sue the company over campaign finance violations

Under Washington’s campaign finance law, commercial advertisers must keep certain information, such as candidates’ names, the cost of the ad and who paid for it and on what date, and the name and address of the ad sponsor. According to the attorney general’s office, at least 38 Washington candidates and committees paid $194,550 for advertising on Twitter, and the company didn’t maintain the required

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Federal government says it will not pay fines for Portland courthouse fence

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will not pay the multi-million dollar fines it owes to two Portland bureaus for erecting an iron fence around the federal courthouse in the city.



a man standing next to a suitcase


© Provided by Washington Examiner


In letters to the Portland Bureau of Transportation and the Bureau of Environmental Services obtained by Pamplin Media, Federal Protective Service Assistant Director David A. Hess claimed the U.S. Constitution’s Supremacy Clause absolves the agency from city fines.

“The Federal Government is absolutely immune from fines or penalties issued by local governments unless there is a clear waiver of sovereign immunity by Congress,” Hess wrote. “There has been no such waiver here.”

The PBOT originally fined the federal government for blocking city bike lanes with the security fence it set up around the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse during this summer’s protests.

At a rate of $500 every 15 minutes, or $48,000

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UK retail body steps up calls for government action on illegal pay

The UK’s largest retail trade body has stepped up its demands for urgent government action to end illegally low wages among garment workers in the UK, arguing that more than 10,000 people have been denied £27m in pay since July.

The British Retail Consortium and MP Lisa Cameron, chair of the all-party parliamentary group on textiles and fashion, have written to Priti Patel, home secretary, to repeat demands for the speedy introduction of a licensing scheme for UK-based textile manufacturers to safeguard factory workers’ pay.

It follows resurfaced reports of many garment workers being paid as little as £3.50 an hour, well below the national minimum wage of £8.72. The scandal has shaken fast-fashion retailer Boohoo, the largest buyer from Britain’s garment hub in Leicester, which is now scrambling to convince stakeholders it can clean up its supply chain after evidence of illegal work practices.

Helen Dickinson, chief executive of

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Cineworld Chief Asks U.K. Government to Reinstate Furlough as Staff Seek Clarity on Pay

Mooky Greidinger, CEO of the Cineworld multiplex group, has written to U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, asking him to reinstate the government furlough scheme, he revealed in a letter to employees on Wednesday.

The furlough scheme helped the company pay employees when cinemas were forced to close due to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

On Monday, the group announced that U.K. and U.S. operations would be temporarily suspended from Friday. The furlough scheme ends in October and from November it will be replaced by a Jobs Support Scheme where employees are required to work at least a third of their former hours. However, with all Cineworld and Picturehouse cinemas shuttering, employees are still left in the dark about their financial future in the run up to Christmas.

“I am sorry to say that the new Government Scheme simply does not fit our business at this time and does not

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Cineworld’s zero-hours staff face no pay as it confirms UK shutdown

Video: Still the world’s best boss? Five years on, the CEO who set $70,000 minimum pay (France 24)

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Consumers pay when government ignores the law

Every few years, an automotive safety scandal results in millions of recalled vehicles and rounds of congressional hearings. Often new laws are passed so we all learn from our mistakes and try to prevent repeating them. Mistakes like not making sure consumers receive recall notices which could prevent death or life-changing injury, or just losing the use of a vehicle to get to work. Sadly, the mistake of failing to address the federal government’s disregard for the law is the one we keep repeating.

We all know car crashes do not care if your car has a Donald Trump or a Joe Biden bumper sticker, or whether you have tested negative for the coronavirus. Now we also know the U.S. Department of Transportation does not seem to care about enacting laws designed to save lives and money. Recently, it was revealed that in March the DOT told Congress that it

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Does the Queen Pay Her Fair Share of Taxes? It Helps to Have the Government on Your Side

Photo credit: SOPA Images - Getty Images
Photo credit: SOPA Images – Getty Images

From Town & Country

No one likes paying taxes and heads of state are no exception. This fact was hammered home last week when the New York Times reported that President Donald Trump, through a series of complex accounting moves, paid minimal tax while in office and even less before he was elected.

Usually governments do everything they can to collect money (Trump, in fact, is being audited by the IRS), but sometimes heads of state can avoid paying tax with the help of the state. For forty years, up until 1993, the British Queen enjoyed an income tax exemption thanks to the generosity of successive UK governments who played cat and mouse with Parliament and the media to keep the matter away from public scrutiny.

Why was it allowed in the first place and, more important, how much was it worth? Recently,

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Politicians, Malaysian civil society leaders pay tribute to former minister VK Liew



a man in a dark room: Liew's passing elicited an outpouring of tributes from both friends and foe for the politician they described as a 'good man' and strong rights advocate. — Picture by Miera Zulyana


© Provided by Malay Mail
Liew’s passing elicited an outpouring of tributes from both friends and foe for the politician they described as a ‘good man’ and strong rights advocate. — Picture by Miera Zulyana

GEORGE TOWN, Oct 2 — The death of Batu Sapi MP Datuk Liew Vui Keong, better known as VK Liew, has elicited an outpouring of tributes from both friends and foe for the politician they described as a “good man” and strong rights advocate.

News of Liew’s passing quickly spread online and within an hour, the term “VK Liew” was trending in Malaysia on Twitter.

Most messages were condolences to Liew’s family from the public, non-governmental organisations and politicians.

Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin also offered his sympathies to the Liew family for their loss.

The All Women’s Action Society tweeted a picture of Liew holding a poster on the Sexual Harassment Bill with

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Britons Would Pay More Tax for a Fairer, More Equal Society Post-COVID-19: Poll

By Emma Batha

LONDON, Sept 30 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Britons would be happy to pay higher taxes for a fairer, more caring and gender-equal society as the coronavirus pandemic transforms people’s views about the world they want to live in, economists said on Wednesday.

In a major report to be presented to parliamentarians, regional governments, and business leaders, they laid out a radical roadmap for building a “caring economy” that puts people and the planet first.

“This is an idea whose time has come,” said Mary-Ann Stephenson, director of feminist think-tank the Women’s Budget Group, which published the report.

“People don’t want to return to business as usual. We’re calling for a fundamental change in the way we approach the economy. It’s about a vision for doing things differently,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

At the heart of the new economy is a recognition of society’s reliance on

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Japanese Government Is Ordered to Pay Damages Over Fukushima Disaster

TOKYO — A high court in Japan on Wednesday became the first at that level to hold the government responsible for the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, saying in a ruling that the state and the plant’s operator must pay about $9.5 million in damages to survivors.

The overpowering earthquake and tsunami that ripped through northern Japan in March 2011 caused a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, leading to the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl.

Under Wednesday’s ruling by the Sendai High Court, the government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, known as Tepco, must compensate 3,550 plaintiffs, the Kyodo news agency reported. The plaintiffs had sought monthly compensation payments of about $475 per person until radiation at their homes returns to pre-crisis levels.

In 2017, a lower court had ordered the government and Tepco to pay about half that amount to about 2,900 plaintiffs. But the ruling by

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