No place in policing for ‘power to mistreat people’: CT departments evolve under duty to intervene law

NEW HAVEN — Winchester Police Chief William Fitzgerald says his department has updated its policies since the state’s law enforcement accountability bill was passed, but the reality is that his officers know “use of force should be one of the last resorts for an arrest.”

Like police departments across Connecticut, Fitzgerald is looking at policies, including the one under which police officers now are expressly required to step in when witnessing another officer using excessive force, as the “duty to intervene,” a section of the police reform bill passed into law by the legislature earlier this year, went into effect on Oct. 1.

The Winchester Police Department in Winsted.

State Senate President Martin M. Looney, D-New Haven, a co-sponsor of the bill, noted that it was passed as legislators dealt with the “shock” of the death of George Floyd while being restrained by police in Minneapolis, with hopes of preventing such an incident from occurring in

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18,000 elderly people have died of COVID-19 in British care homes and now Boris Johnson’s government is being accused of human rights abuse



a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor's hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty


© Getty
Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor’s hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty

  • The death of thousands of COVID-19 in British care homes was a violation of their human rights, according to Amnesty International.
  • The human rights organization has now called for the public inquiry, promised by the government in July, to begin immediately. 
  • The report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued on a blanket basis in care homes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

More than 18,000 untested elderly people died of COVID-19 in British care homes in what a damning new report from Amnesty International has described as a violation of their human rights.

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Between March and June, over 28,116 “excess deaths” were recorded in care homes in England, with 18,500 of them confirmed to have

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Nebraska Humane Society goes the distance to connect people and pets | Local News

While the animals are listed online, Wiese said, the humane society wanted to give people a more personal connection with the animals they might adopt. 

“It’s hard to get a feel for a dog with a photo,” she said. 

Greg Sims, president and CEO of FIDO Friendly, said the magazine decided to make an extra stop this year in Omaha on their way back west from Chicago. Although the magazine originally planned 11 stops, all but a handful of shelters cancelled their events. 



Adoption Event

Omaha residents visit the Nebraska Humane Society’s adoption event held Sunday to meet potential new pets. 




“This year is just different,” he said, “everything is more challenging.” 

Those challenges haven’t stopped the tour, Sims said, and they continue to work for the welfare of animals. He said over the years, the magazine has helped to place over 15,000 animals in permanent homes. 

Laurie Zagurski,

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Do you catch yourself referring to people with politic beliefs opposite to yours as morons/ idiots or the like?

I was out last weekend with my SO and some of his close friends who don’t necessarily know my politic persuasions. It’s always been assumed that no one in their group would hang out with anyone who felt differently than they did on the US President, ride or die situation.

Very quickly the co go went to these “idiots” and I just went along with it since I hear that from some people on all sides and wasn’t surprised. My SO was like… well let’s calm down they aren’t idiots. I stopped him, what’s the point let’s move on to common ground.

I’ve never thought the people voting opposite of me were idiots. I do want to listen and hear why they feel as they do and vote as they vote, 7 to 8 times out of 10 I get a reason that makes some kind of sense or a

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Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan’s award shows why people distrust government

By Darren A. Nichols
Published 2:28 p.m. ET Oct. 3, 2020

The Duggan administration made national headlines last week, but it wasn’t for anything the Mayor will use in his next “State of the City” address. 

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and his team were named the most secretive publicly funded agency or person in the country by the Investigative Reporters and Editors journalism association, earning its “Golden Padlock” award. 

The group cited the administration’s handling of public documents having to do with Make Your Date, a maternal health organization that worked with the city to fight infant mortality.  

A Free Press investigation in 2019 showed how the administration directed $358,000 in  city grant to Make Your Date and had staff raise money for the nonprofit, which is led by a woman with ties to Duggan. During the course of its investigation, the Free Press learned that the administration had attempted

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House Speaker Michael Madigan says it’s not ‘ethically improper’ to find government jobs for people. Here’s what he’s failing to mention.

For years, Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan has defended his aggressive push to land political allies and their friends and family on taxpayer-funded payrolls, but rarely has he waxed as philosophically about it as he did last week in a three-page letter.



Michael Madigan wearing a suit and tie: Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District talks with House Republican Leader Jim Durkin (R) 82nd District before a debate at Illinois House to vote on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District talks with House Republican Leader Jim Durkin (R) 82nd District before a debate at Illinois House to vote on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.



Michael Madigan standing in front of a door: Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District watches as Illinois House votes on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District watches as Illinois House votes on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.

Facing intense pressure from a federal investigation into ComEd’s bribes-for-favors scandal

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Another Voice: Society must create ways for young people to thrive | Opinion

As families and students struggle with the social, emotional, physical, and educational repercussions of Covid-19, it might seem a little too much to insist that we can still prepare our children (and ourselves) to lead thriving lives. But I fervently believe that we cannot postpone this mission while we wait for a vaccine. We must push ahead now to ensure our young people are prepared to thrive.

First, what does thriving mean? Interestingly, our verb “to thrive” is derived from an Old Norse word, which means to “grasp to oneself” or “to grab hold of.” In other words, to thrive is the lifelong development of the totality of yourself, including physical and emotional well-being that enables you to pursue a passionate purpose in your private and public lives.

Every person who is thriving is successful, but not every successful person is thriving. Leading a thriving life means so much more

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Historic California law establishes path to reparations for Black people, descendants of slaves

California is the first state to adopt a law paving the way for Black residents and descendants of slaves to receive reparation payments.

The legislation, which was authored by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a Democrat representing San Diego and chair of California’s Legislative Black Caucus, does not commit to any specific payment. Instead, it establishes a nine-person task force that will study the impact of slavery on Black people in California and recommend to the Legislature what kind of compensation should be provided, who should receive it and what form that compensation will take.

Gov. Gavin Newson signed the law Wednesday afternoon.

“After watching last night’s debate, this signing can’t come too soon,” he said during a video conference with lawmakers and other stakeholders, including rapper Ice Cube, who used his celebrity to champion the bill.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has

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UK coronavirus live: Boris Johnson denies people are confused about local lockdown rules | Politics













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California law prioritizes people over corporate home-buyers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Tenants, affordable housing groups and local governments will get first crack at buying foreclosed homes under a measure approved Monday by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

The bill is designed to keep corporations from snapping up homes and letting some fall into disrepair as they did during the Great Recession. The issue drew national attention a year ago when several homeless mothers calling themselves Moms 4 Housing moved into a vacant, corporate-owned house in West Oakland.

It was among 15 bills Newsom signed into law as renters and home-buyers again struggle during mass layoffs prompted by the pandemic. The governor said the measures “will directly lead to more affordable opportunities for renters and homeowners.”

The law bars sellers of foreclosed homes from bundling them at auction for sale to a single buyer. In addition, it will allow tenants, families, local governments, affordable housing nonprofits and community land

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