New law aims to protect finances, privacy of child social media stars

Some young children earn millions of dollars through social media influencing and promotion, but there’s little legislation or protection for most. A new law in France aims to try to safeguard children under the age of 16, protecting their finances and providing some privacy.

The legislation, which was passed unanimously by the French parliament on Oct. 6, creates a “legal framework” that gives social media stars the same protections as French child models and actors.

A press release about the law says videos of child influencers online raise “important questions about the interests of the children they portray” and raises questions about the “impact celebrity can have on the psychological development of children, the risks of cyber-harassment, even child pornography, and the fact that these activities are not regulated by labor law.”

Bruno Studer, the politician behind the bill, told the French newspaper Le Monde that the law would make

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Trump’s Doctor Leans on Health Privacy Law to Duck Questions | Health News

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president’s treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient’s condition.

But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley’s selective disclosures appears to be Trump’s comfort level in fully revealing his medical information.

“That’s a little head-scratcher,” said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It’s quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.”

At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in

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Trump’s doctor leans on health privacy law to duck questions

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president’s treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient’s condition.

But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley’s selective disclosures appears to be Trump’s comfort level in fully revealing his medical information.

“That’s a little head-scratcher,” said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It’s quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.”

At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges.

But when

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A Former Spy Shares Why the U.S. Needs a Data Privacy Law… Yesterday

Photo credit: Susanna Hayward / Getty Images - Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Susanna Hayward / Getty Images – Hearst Owned

From Marie Claire

Data privacy legislation is not about secrecy; it’s about transparency. I know a lot about both. I was one of the original coauthors of the initiative that became the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), the most comprehensive privacy law in the U.S., and before that I was a CIA counterintelligence officer and counsel on the House Intelligence Committee. Surprisingly, it was my career as a spy—where I did things like provide oversight of the NSA wiretapping program Edward Snowden later disclosed—that made me realize how desperately the U.S. needs a law to protect consumers’ online privacy. I’m inspired by this quote shared by Gabriel Weinberg, the founder of the privacy-focused search engine DuckDuckGo: “Everyone knows what you do in the bathroom, but you still close the door.” In other words, your info may not be a secret,

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California’s Prop. 24 is the right framework for America’s privacy law

Americans deserve privacy online. Currently, Big Tech siphons the data of millions of Americans every minute and sells and resells that data for billions of dollars. Most of us never see a dime from any of that. It’s time to put control of data and privacy rights back where it belongs: with ordinary Americans like you and me.

That is why I support Proposition 24, the California Privacy Rights Act. This initiative builds on the foundation of California’s landmark privacy law, passed by the Legislature in 2018, and will provide even greater data control and privacy protection to Californians if it passes. It includes strong measures, such as the creation of a new consumer protection agency to be a watchdog over big tech, and expands on the tools Californians have when companies misuse their data under the law.

Prop. 24 puts money back where it belongs — in the hands

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