U.S. Supreme Court rejects Indiana’s factory farm case

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The Supreme Court began its new term Monday with a remembrance of “a dear friend and a treasured colleague,” the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Oct. 5)

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Nearly five years after Richard and Janet Himsel’s legal battle over odors and other alleged harm from the nearby confined hog feeding operation began, it appears to be coming to a close.

Earlier this year, the Hendricks County couple, with the help of a local environmental group, asked the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on their case that claimed Indiana’s Right to Farm Act violated the U.S. Constitution. On Monday, the nation’s highest court rejected that appeal. 

The court is asked to review more than 7,000 cases each year, and it usually accepts only about 100 to 150. Kim Ferraro, senior staff attorney for the Hoosier Environmental Council and the plaintiff’s counsel, said in July when the petition was

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Irish government rejects return to full coronavirus lockdown

The Irish government has rejected a recommendation to return the country to a full lockdown in the first clash with health chiefs since the Covid outbreak began.



Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

The surprise recommendation by the National Public Health Emergency Team (NPHET) late on Sunday to impose the highest of five levels of restrictions possible with immediate effect had led to sharp criticism from some of the country’s most senior politicians, including the former taoiseach Leo Varadkar.

While the rising spread of the virus is causing alarm and has led to partial lockdowns in several counties, most of the country is still on level 2 restrictions, involving fewer limits to social and economic activity.

Ministers faced opposition from politicians and business to what would have amounted to Europe’s first major second-wave national lockdown.

On Monday night, the cabinet opted to move the country to level

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Judge rejects John Bolton bid to dismiss government lawsuit seeking book proceeds

“The government has the power to prevent harm to the national security,” Lamberth wrote in a 26-page opinion. “While the government may not prevent Bolton from publishing unclassified materials, it may require him to undergo a reasonable prepublication review process. The . . . agreements are thus consistent with the First Amendment.”

In a statement, lead Bolton attorney Charles J. Cooper said, “The Court’s decision, which we are still studying, means that the case will now move forward to the phase in which the parties will develop and present their evidence to the Court.”

Legal analysts said Lamberth’s opinion underscored that Bolton is in serious legal jeopardy, and made it more difficult for other national security professionals to publish without risk of being sued by the government.

“This is a horrible new precedent,” said Mark S. Zaid, a lawyer who specializes in national security and whistleblower cases. “Before this case

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Judge rejects John Bolton’s effort to dismiss government lawsuit over book

A federal judge on Thursday denied former Trump national security adviser John Bolton’s effort to get the government’s lawsuit over his book dismissed.

That allows the Justice Department to proceed in its effort to seize his profits from the book, “The Room Where it Happened,” a harsh condemnation of the Trump White House and its handling of foreign policy.

Federal District Court Judge Royce Lamberth said the government “alleges sufficient facts to support its claim” that Bolton violated his obligations to get written permission to proceed with publication after the book was reviewed to remove any classified information. The judge found the government has a sufficiently strong case to move on to the next step.

Justice Department lawyers have asked the judge to rule for them on summary judgment, without a trial. The judge said he will rule on that soon.

The government filed its lawsuit in June, arguing that

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Federal judge rejects Indiana absentee voting law, extending ballot deadline

A federal judge has rejected Indiana’s noon Election Day deadline to receive absentee ballots, allowing Hoosiers more time to mail in absentee ballots for the Nov. 3 presidential election.

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The Tuesday evening ruling from U.S. Southern Indiana District Judge Sarah Evans Barker means absentee ballots postmarked on or before Nov. 3 and received on or before Nov. 13 will be counted.



a stack of flyers on a table: Stacks of envelopes prepare to be stuffed with absentee ballots at the Marion County election board service center in Indianapolis on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Because seasonal election workers are processing thousands of applications, there is room for human error. Election board leaders encourage voters who qualify for an absentee ballot to send their applications early and bring ballot errors to the board's attention as soon as possible.


© Jenna Watson/IndyStar
Stacks of envelopes prepare to be stuffed with absentee ballots at the Marion County election board service center in Indianapolis on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Because seasonal election workers are processing thousands of applications, there is room for human error. Election board leaders encourage voters who qualify for an absentee ballot to send their applications early and bring ballot errors to the board’s attention as soon as possible.

Julia Vaughn, policy director at

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Court rejects students’ bid to practice law without passing exam



As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.


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As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.


As the State Bar prepares for California’s first-ever online bar exam next month, the state Supreme Court rejected one alternative Wednesday, a request by a group of law school graduates to practice law without passing the exam.

A petition by two recent graduates, signed by nearly 1,900 students, said an online exam using little-tested software would be unreliable and unfair to low-income and minority students who lacked equal access to computers and quiet space at home. The justices denied a hearing on their request without comment.

But the court will soon consider another option, a plan by the State Bar to let law school graduates practice law in California under

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Hungary’s Orban Rejects Criticism Over Rule of Law, Says He Is a ‘Freedom Fighter’ | World News

By John Chalmers and Gabriela Baczynska

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, declaring himself a “freedom fighter” for national sovereignty, rejected on Friday a plan that would force European Union member states to welcome asylum seekers.

In an interview with Reuters, Orban also denied charges that he flouts democracy and said he would continue to resist those who want an “empire-like” EU built around its institutions rather than its member states.

“When somebody says that democracy can be only liberal it’s an oppression. I have to fight against it in the name of intellectual freedom,” he said. “Sometimes in Brussels I have a feeling that I am still a freedom fighter.”

Orban, 57, has crossed swords with other EU leaders over his moves to put the judiciary, non-governmental organisations, media and academics under more state control in his central European state.

Critics in the EU say he defends

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Raymond McNair Rejects God’s Government

I preface my comments by giving credit where credit is due, showing a great love and appreciation for Raymond F. McNair being blessed to serve as one of the pioneers in the Worldwide Church of God and to have such an active and important role in the holy Work of fulfilling the Great Commission under God’s apostle Herbert W. Armstrong, serving thousands of brethren over the years. I want this on record since he is an elder and deserving of biblical respect, while I respectfully and strongly disagree with him on the sacred calendar, as a brother in the Lord.

I am very happy to see Raymond McNair acknowledge the Jews have a God-given authority to include postponements in the sacred calendar. Some Church of God members reject this plain truth and go off the deep end, creating their own calendars in the confusion of a spiritual anarchy, a Laodicean … Read More